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For this week's assignment in my CS class, we have to revise our current program to dynamically allocate memory for all arrays. We have to ensure that no memory is wasted on empty elements. We have to do this by assignment character arrays to temp arrays, size checking the temp, and then allocating an array of that size.

Anyway, I don't get how to do it with a struct. I know how to dynamically allocate memory, for example

int* pointer = new int(5);

But how do I do that for struct members? It seems like unless you define the size up front, the computer wouldn't know how much space to allocate when you declare a struct of that type.

Right now, my struct definition is like so:

struct card
   {
   char rank[10];
   char suit[10];
   char color;
   bool dealt;
   char location[12];
   };

How do I change all the arrays to be declared dynamically, without specifying size?

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Do you know how to access a variable inside a struct? –  Code-Apprentice Feb 22 '13 at 5:11
    
no @user1362548 deck1.color='A' –  Aniket Feb 22 '13 at 5:12
    
@user1362548 Now change all your arrays to pointers. Then access each pointer inside it and order to allocate the memory. –  Code-Apprentice Feb 22 '13 at 5:13
    
Thanks code-guru, makes sense :) Just wanted reassurance before I change dozens of lines of code –  Bobazonski Feb 22 '13 at 5:13
    
@Zeta That's more or less what the OP had (until they deleted their comment) other than inizializing the color variable. –  Code-Apprentice Feb 22 '13 at 5:15

4 Answers 4

struct card
   {
    char *rank;
    char *suit;
    char color;
    bool dealt;
    char *location;
   };

Just take pointers inside the structure and dynamically allocate memory to them, dont forget to free them after use..

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struct card
{
   char* rank;
   char* suit;
   char color;
   bool dealt;
   char* location;
};

The compiler doesnt need to know the size you are allocating, since all this struct would store is a pointer to the allocated memory.

The size of the pointers, and thus the struct, would be the same if you allocate 1 element each or 1000 elements each.

card c;
c.location = new char[10];

p.s. Just checking, are you aware that the below code allocated 1 element and sets that to 5, rather than allocate 5 elements? See wikipedia for the difference between the two uses.

int* pointer = new int(5);
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Thanks, just needed to know how it works behind the scenes, and your description makes sense. –  Bobazonski Feb 22 '13 at 5:15
    
@user1362548 please read the last few lines, possible bug in your code.. –  Karthik T Feb 22 '13 at 5:18

using a char* rank? and when you use it, card->rank = malloc(sizeof(char)*size)?

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In any case you don't need to change your struct variables, just change how you call it by using typedef:

typdef struct _CARD
   {
   char rank[10];
   char suit[10];
   char color;
   bool dealt;
   char location[12];
   } CARD;

To initialize an array of CARD's use:

CARD* card;
#define ARRSIZE 12

card = (CARD*)malloc(sizeof(CARD)*ARRSIZE);

For more dynamic struct allocation, use linked list by calling struct itself as a pointer: typdef struct _CARD

 typdef struct _CARD {
   char rank[10];
   char suit[10];
   char color;
   bool dealt;
   char location[12];
   struct _CARD  *_next;
   } CARD;

and initialize every struct as needed and bind them using _next pointer:

    CARD *card,*tmp,*final,*first,*etc;
    card = (CARD*)malloc(sizeof(CARD));
    tmp= (CARD*)malloc(sizeof(CARD));
    card->_next = tmp;
    final = (CARD*)malloc(sizeof(CARD));
    tmp->_next = final;
    final->_next = NULL;

and so on, you need to have additional functions to manage dynamically created structs and their bonds.

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