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I've been writing a game and I remember in a previous coop I was working on a video decoder that would crash after 5 minutes of usage because there was no memory left.

My boss spent all day trying to fix it and came back to see me the next day a little pissed cause he told me I did not put every class member attribute in the constructor's initializer list.

It was an int or maybe some other data/primitive. Now I thought stuff in a class was initialized with a default value instead of being affected by whatever lingered at the adress. I never really thought of asking this question until now that I am doing the same so I wanted to clarify this.

Let's say I do :

#pragma once
#include "GameState.h"
#include "GameGrid.h"

class Shape;

class PlayState : public GameState
{

....

private:
sf::Clock _keyPressClock;

Shape *_droppingShape;
int generateShapeID();
int generateHorizSpawnPos();
};

If all my constructor initializes is the pointer :

PlayState::PlayState() : _droppingShape(NULL) {}

Is that bad practice or can indeed cause a memory leak?

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IIRC, member variables are initialized with the "default constructor" if not explicitly initialized in an initializer list. You can later assign a value to a member variable to a value in the constructor body, but this is less efficient. –  Code-Apprentice Feb 22 '13 at 5:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Now I thought stuff in a class was initialized with a default value instead of being affected by whatever lingered at the adress.

Well, that's partially true, in the sense that member variables are constructed when the object's constructor is executed. However, fundamental types (like ints, pointers and so on) don't have constructors, so you can't rely on them to be initialized with anything in particular (also see this).

It's generally considered good practice to initialize these types in the initializer list but it's not always necessary, if you initialize them elsewhere before you start using them.

You'll get no memory leaks unless you allocate some memory first, but you will definitely get some errors (which may even be silent) if you delete a pointer which has some random value because it has not been initialized with nullptr.

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Good practise? Yes, esp. for pointers, since NULL/nullptr is the only way we know the pointer doesn't point to an object.

Memory leak? No, no allocation => no leak.

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IIRC, member variables are initialized with the "default constructor" if not explicitly initialized in an initializer list. You can later assign a value to a member variable to a value in the constructor body, but this is less efficient.

As for the memory leak, these can only occur when you have allocated memory with new or new[]. As long as you don't use these, then there is no memory leak. However, if you are using pointers, this allocation will occur somewhere, even if it is hidden inside an auto_ptr.

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