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How do I get an "E" output rather than 69?

package main

import "fmt"

func main() {
    fmt.Print("HELLO"[1])
}

Does go have function to convert a char to byte and vice versa?

Thank you in advance.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Interpreted string literals are character sequences between double quotes "" using the (possibly multi-byte) UTF-8 encoding of individual characters. In UTF-8, ASCII characters are single-byte corresponding to the first 128 Unicode characters. Strings behave like slices of bytes. A rune is an integer value identifying a Unicode code point. Therefore,

package main

import "fmt"

func main() {
    fmt.Println(string("Hello"[1]))              // ASCII only
    fmt.Println(string([]rune("Hello, 世界")[1])) // UTF-8
    fmt.Println(string([]rune("Hello, 世界")[8])) // UTF-8
}

Output:

e
e
界

See the Go Programming Language Specification section on Conversions.

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How about this?

fmt.Printf("%c","HELLO"[1])

As Peter points out, to allow for more than just ASCII:

fmt.Printf("%c", []rune("HELLO")[1])
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1  
This only works for the ASCII character set. –  peterSO Feb 22 '13 at 9:02
    
Quite right, thanks! –  Rich Churcher Feb 22 '13 at 14:24

The general solution to interpreting a char as a string is string("HELLO"[1]).

Rich's solution also works, of course.

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1  
This only works for the ASCII character set. –  peterSO Feb 22 '13 at 9:02

Go doesn't really have a character type as such. byte is often used for ASCII characters, and rune is used for Unicode characters, but they are both just aliases for integer types (uint8 and int32). So if you want to force them to be printed as characters instead of numbers, you need to use Printf("%c", x). The %c format specification works for any integer type.

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