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i want to check if sheet exist before creating it .Thank u in advance

using Excel = Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel;

Excel.Application excel = new Excel.Application();
excel.Visible = true;
Excel.Workbook wb = excel.Workbooks.Open(@"C:\"Example".xlsx");


Excel.Worksheet sh = wb.Sheets.Add();
int count = wb.Sheets.Count;

sh.Name = "Example";
sh.Cells[1, "A"].Value2 = "Example";
sh.Cells[1, "B"].Value2 = "Example"
wb.Close(true);
excel.Quit();
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Create a loop like this:

// Keeping track
bool found = false;
// Loop through all worksheets in the workbook
foreach(Excel.Worksheet sheet in wb.Sheets)
{
    // Check the name of the current sheet
    if (sheet.Name == "Example")
    {
        found = true;
        break; // Exit the loop now
    }
}

if (found)
{
    // Reference it by name
    Worksheet mySheet = wb.Sheets["Example"];
}
else
{
    // Create it
}

I'm not into Office Interop very much, but come to think of it, you could also try the following, much shorter way:

Worksheet mySheet;
mySheet = wb.Sheets["NameImLookingFor"];

if (mySheet == null)
    // Create a new sheet

But I'm not sure if that would simply return null without throwing an exception; you would have to try the second method for yourself.

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HI , Thank u If possible can you tell me how to select the existing sheet so the sheet can worked on with –  Anand S Feb 22 '13 at 11:06
    
I will edit my answer a little to explain. –  John Willemse Feb 22 '13 at 12:21
    
Thank u it solved my issue :) , the second method throws an exception –  Anand S Feb 22 '13 at 13:29

Why not just do this:

try {

    Excel.Worksheet wks = wkb.Worksheets["Example"];

 } catch (System.Runtime.InteropServices.COMException) {

    // Create the worksheet
 }

 wks.Select();

The other way avoids throwing and catching exceptions, and certainly it's a legitimate answer, but I found this and wanted to put this up as an alternative.

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