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I am working on a project in PCL (Point Cloud Library, www.pointclouds.org) with this library I can get a 3D representation of what my Kinect is looking at. the problem is, I am using this struct:

typedef union
{
    struct
    {
            unsigned char Blue;
            unsigned char Green;
            unsigned char Red;
            unsigned char Alpha;
    };
    float float_value;
    uint32_t long_value;
} RGBValue;

What I want to do with this struct, is to get the individual data from each color and put them in floats:

float R = someCloud->points[idx].rgba.Red;   
float G = someCloud->points[idx].rgba.Green;  
float B = someCloud->points[idx].rgba.Blue;  
float A = someCloud->points[idx].rgba.Alpha;  

the error I am getting is this:

error C2039: 'Red' : is not a member of 'System::UInt32'*
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Have you named your struct? –  bash.d Feb 22 '13 at 10:00
    
is points an array of RGBValue instances? –  Roman Saveljev Feb 22 '13 at 10:00
    
What is rgba in the expression someCloud->points[idx].rgba.Red; ? –  harper Feb 22 '13 at 10:02
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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You must name your anonymous struct instance accordingly

typedef union
{
    struct
    {
        unsigned char Blue;
        unsigned char Green;
        unsigned char Red;
        unsigned char Alpha;
    } rgba;

    float float_value;
    uint32_t long_value;
} RGBValue;

You can then access the members as

RGBValue v;
float R = v.rgba.Red;
float G = v.rgba.Green;
float B = v.rgba.Blue;
float A = v.rgba.Alpha;
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1  
Well, to be correct, this doesn't give the struct a name but the struct instance. And without the name there is no instance at all. –  leemes Feb 22 '13 at 10:10
    
Your solution is correct, but your text is wrong. That's not naming a struct, that's instancing an anonymous struct. –  Jack Aidley Feb 22 '13 at 10:11
    
@leemes, JackAidley You're both correct, I've been sloppy in my answer. Thank you, fixed. –  Olaf Dietsche Feb 22 '13 at 10:19
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This:

typedef union
{
    struct
    {
        unsigned char Blue;
        unsigned char Green;
        unsigned char Red;
        unsigned char Alpha;
    };
    float float_value;
    uint32_t long_value;
} RGBValue;

declares a union type, with a nested struct type. The union only contains a float or a uint32_t - you never declared an instance of your nested struct.

You can give your type a name, so you can use it elsewhere:

typedef union
{
    struct RGBA // named struct type
    {
        unsigned char Blue;
        unsigned char Green;
        unsigned char Red;
        unsigned char Alpha;
    };
    RGBA rgba; // AND an instance of that type
    float float_value;
    uint32_t long_value;
} RGBValue;

or leave the type anonymous and just declare an instance, as Olaf showed. (The named type in my example can be referred to as RGBValue::RGBA)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for proper naming and explanation. –  Olaf Dietsche Feb 22 '13 at 10:20
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