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Is there a way to compute -log10values.

Where values are very small i.e., 3*e-178 or e-320.

I have tried open office with the formula log((1/value),10), it works fine but when it encounters extremely small values it gives error like division by zero not possible.

I guess same will happen when I will use perl or python or R.

Kindly help in converting these values to -log10value

Thank you

Note: I want to compute minus log of value with base 10

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Where do you get your numbers from and what do they represent? –  QkuCeHBH Feb 22 '13 at 11:37
    
these are p values –  Angelo Feb 22 '13 at 12:20
    
I'm thinking any null hypothesis is probably false at those values. –  Andy Barbour Feb 23 '13 at 3:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A perl one liner:

perl -e 'print log($ARGV[0])/log(10),"\n"' 3e-320

output:

-319.522883580228
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it produces Can't take log of 0 at -e line 1. on Ubuntu box (perl v5.14.2) i.e., 3e-320 is too small. Though it works on ideone. –  J.F. Sebastian Feb 22 '13 at 20:12
    
@J.F.Sebastian: It works for me on Debian 2.6.32 / perl 5.10 and windows / perl 5.14 until 3e-324 and fails at 3e-325 –  M42 Feb 23 '13 at 9:28

In R:

x <- 3e-320
log10(x)
#-319.5229

y <- 3*exp(-320)
log10(y)
#-138.4971

For big exponents:

library(Brobdingnag)
x <- 3*as.brob(10)^(-1000)
log10(x)
#-999.5229

y <- 3*as.brob(exp(1))^(-1000)
log10(y)
#-433.8174

Or:

log10(3)-1000
#-999.5229
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In Python:

import math
math.log10(3e-320)

returns

-319.5228835802284

To get more information about Python abilities in very small values:

import sys
sys.float_info

returns (depends on your system):

sys.float_info(max=1.7976931348623157e+308,
               max_exp=1024,
               max_10_exp=308,
               min=2.2250738585072014e-308,
               min_exp=-1021,
               min_10_exp=-307,
               dig=15,
               mant_dig=53,
               epsilon=2.220446049250313e-16,
               radix=2,
               rounds=1)

While math.log10(3e-320) returns the correct value, math.log10(3e-325) raises a ValueError: math domain error.

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As you should be able to tell from the other answers, a better formula is -log10(value) or, in an OpenOffice Calc spreadsheet, =-LOG(value,10).

You need to make certain that the value entered does not underflow to 0, however. -LOG(3E-178,10) works (177.522879), but -LOG(1E-320,10) fails because 1E-320 underflows to 0 and an Err.502 is presented. (That's probably why your use of 1/value exploded too.)

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You could compute log10 with arbitrary precision using decimal module in Python e.g., using default precision:

from decimal import Decimal as D

for f in [3e-178, 1e-320, 3e-320, "1e-325", "3e-325"]:
     print("%s\t%s" % (f, D(f).log10()))

Output

3e-178  -177.5228787452803375835172220
1e-320  -320.0000048349480421542963792
3e-320  -319.5228835802283797170013513
1e-325  -325
3e-325  -324.5228787452803375627049721

Or:

import decimal

decimal.getcontext().prec = 70
for f in [3e-178, 1e-320, 3e-320, "1e-325", "3e-325"]:
     print("%s\t%s" % (f, decimal.Decimal(f).log10()))

Output

3e-178  -177.5228787452803375835172220093158130425818111446701314507791687173572
1e-320  -320.0000048349480421542963791664378178773271498211156984605956663618384
3e-320  -319.5228835802283797170013512631827025681270209569250025957658007215332
1e-325  -325
3e-325  -324.5228787452803375627049720967448846907998711358093041351701343596948
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