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The following code is correct

    string s1="abc";
    string s2="bcd";
    string &rs1=s1;
    string &rs2=s2;
    rs1=rs2;
    cout<<rs1<<"----"<<rs2<<endl;

And thefollowing code will compile error:

class A
{
public:
    A(string& a):ma(a) { }

    string& ma;
};

string s1="abc";
string s2="bcd";
A oa(s1);
A ob(s2);
oa=ob;
cout<<oa.ma<<"----"<<ob.ma<<endl;

All above is string& type assignment, why put them into class will cause a compile error? (gcc version 4.7.1 )

error info is

non-static reference member 'std::string& A::ma', can't use default assignment operator
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2  
I believe it is because the string passed into ctor (string a) by value, which is a temporary object that is not allowed to initialize the string ref? –  Adrian Shum Feb 22 '13 at 10:35
    
I change that, but it still has error –  zhenyuyang Feb 22 '13 at 10:48
    
@zhenyuyang Please post the exact text of the error as an addition to your question; not here in a comment. –  WhozCraig Feb 22 '13 at 10:48
    
oa.ma = ob.ma would have the same effect as the first example. Assigning the whole class doesn't work, because the default assignment operator isn't generated when the class contains references or const members. –  Bo Persson Feb 22 '13 at 10:50
    
@BoPersson Exactly, that should be the error he's still getting. At least thats the one clang will throw at me without providing an assignment operator explicitly. –  WhozCraig Feb 22 '13 at 10:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're setting a member reference to a local temp variable. the parameter in your constructor is a temp). This is causing a "dangling reference", which is not good.

Change the param to a reference, or change your member to a non-reference. For your purposes you'll likely want:

class A
{
public:
    A(string& a):ma(a) { }

    A& operator =(const A& other) 
    { 
        ma = other.ma; 
        return *this; 
    }

    string& ma;
};

But you should know, the default copy constructor of your class is probably not going to do what you think it will.

UPDATE

Specific area of the standard dealing with why the default copy-assignment operator is deleted when the class has a reference member:

C++11 § 12.8,p23

A defaulted copy/move assignment operator for class X is defined as deleted if X has: - a variant member with a non-trivial corresponding assignment operator and X is a union-like class, or

  • a non-static data member of const non-class type (or array thereof), or
  • a non-static data member of reference type, or
  • a non-static data member of class type M (or array thereof) that cannot be copied/moved because overload resolution (13.3), as applied to M’s corresponding assignment operator, results in an ambiguity or a function that is deleted or inaccessible from the defaulted assignment operator, or
  • a direct or virtual base class B that cannot be copied/moved because overload resolution (13.3), as applied to B’s corresponding assignment operator, results in an ambiguity or a function that is deleted or inaccessible from the defaulted assignment operator, or
  • for the move assignment operator, a non-static data member or direct base class with a type that does not have a move assignment operator and is not trivially copyable, or any direct or indirect virtual base class.
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I change this, but it still has error –  zhenyuyang Feb 22 '13 at 10:46
    
@zhenyuyang I updated it to includes the assignment override, but as I said, you may not like the result. (which will be bcd----bcd by the way) –  WhozCraig Feb 22 '13 at 10:54
    
thanks! But why the default assignment operator isn't generated when the class contains references? –  zhenyuyang Feb 22 '13 at 10:57
    
@zhenyuyang I'll point to the provision in the standard where the conditions for deleting the default assignment operator are warranted. I'll need a minute, but ultimately it is because the provided assignment operator is only supposed to modify the object, and with a member reference type, that cannot happen. references are forever fixed (unless dangling) once they are established. –  WhozCraig Feb 22 '13 at 11:24

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