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Does Files.createTempDirectory remove the directory after JVM exits normally? Or do I need to manually recursively remove the temporary directory content?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As per the API, no it doesn't, you need to manually remove the directory, using file.deleteOnExit() method.

As with the createTempFile methods, this method is only part of a temporary-file facility. A shutdown-hook, or the File.deleteOnExit() mechanism may be used to delete the directory automatically.

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2  
@HowardGuo, I don't think so, you are passing null to createTempDirectory method –  Simz Feb 22 '13 at 10:49
1  
@HowardGuo, docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/io/dirs.html this should give you more information –  Simz Feb 22 '13 at 10:51
1  
@HowardGuo, no it cannot be :) In the link you can refer example program –  Simz Feb 22 '13 at 10:55
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@HowardGuo, yes prefix maybe null, but not others. If you read API docs, this method accepts 3 arguments and your code won't compile since you are passing only 1 argument –  Simz Feb 22 '13 at 11:00
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@PradeepSimha - what makes you say you can't pass null? You certainly can call Files.createTempDirectory(null), this works exactly as one would expect - it creates a new arbitrarily named directory and returns its Path. –  dimo414 Nov 29 '13 at 8:15

Temporary directories created by Files.createTempDirectory() are not deleted upon system exit, unless you configure them to do so:

A shutdown-hook, or the File.deleteOnExit() mechanism may be used to delete the directory automatically.

Meaning you could call:

Path tmp = Files.createTempDirectory(null);
tmp.toFile().deleteOnExit();

However you cannot delete a directory unless it's empty, as document by File.delete():

Deletes the file or directory denoted by this abstract pathname. If this pathname denotes a directory, then the directory must be empty in order to be deleted.

So we need to get a bit fancier if you want the directory and its contents deleted. You can recursively register a directory and its children for deletion like so:

public static void recursiveDeleteOnExit(Path path) throws IOException {
  Files.walkFileTree(path, new SimpleFileVisitor<Path>() {
    @Override
    public FileVisitResult visitFile(Path file,
        @SuppressWarnings("unused") BasicFileAttributes attrs) {
      file.toFile().deleteOnExit();
      return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
    }
    @Override
    public FileVisitResult preVisitDirectory(Path dir,
        @SuppressWarnings("unused") BasicFileAttributes attrs) {
      dir.toFile().deleteOnExit();
      return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
    }
  });
}

Take note however, this registers all currently existing files for deletion - if after calling this method you create new files, they and their parent directories will not be deleted per the documented behavior of File.delete().

If you want to delete a directory upon exit, regardless of the contents of said directory, you can use a shutdown-hook in an almost identical manner:

public static void recursiveDeleteOnShutdownHook(final Path path) {
  Runtime.getRuntime().addShutdownHook(new Thread(
    new Runnable() {
      @Override
      public void run() {
        try {
          Files.walkFileTree(path, new SimpleFileVisitor<Path>() {
            @Override
            public FileVisitResult visitFile(Path file,
                @SuppressWarnings("unused") BasicFileAttributes attrs)
                throws IOException {
              Files.delete(file);
              return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
        }
        @Override
        public FileVisitResult postVisitDirectory(Path dir, IOException e)
            throws IOException {
          if (e == null) {
            Files.delete(dir);
            return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
          }
          // directory iteration failed
          throw e;
        }
        });
      } catch (IOException e) {
        throw new RuntimeException("Failed to delete "+path, e);
      }
    }}));
}

Note however that calling this repeatedly registers a new shutdown thread each time, which could potentially cause problems at scale. File.deleteOnExit() stores a set of registered files, and deletes all of them in one shutdown hook. If you need to delete many directories in this manner, you'd want to implement something similar.

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No it doesn't - createTempDirectory

As with the createTempFile methods, this method is only part of a temporary-file facility. A shutdown-hook, or the File.deleteOnExit() mechanism may be used to delete the directory automatically.

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No, it doesn't. You have to do it on your own. Or use java.io.File.deleteOnExit() but I guess it doesn't work for non-empty directories

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1  
I would love Java more if new File(Files.createTempDirectory(null).toString()).deleteOnExit() works, hahaha.. –  user972946 Feb 22 '13 at 10:44
1  
It works exactly as documented - "the directory must be empty in order to be deleted" - wanting to delete a non-empty directory is reasonable, but don't confuse your desire with "Java doesn't work". –  dimo414 Nov 29 '13 at 7:48

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