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When you use a pointer like int* in C#, you need to use the unsafe keyword, but when you use an IntPtr, you don't. What is the difference of these? They both can point to an address.

How does the garbage collector deal with these two types? Are they dealt with differently? If so, what is the difference? If not, why one needs the unsafe keyword?

Edit: Thanks a lot for everyone's answers so far, but what I would like to know is how they are handled differently by the framework and the garbage collector, rather than the MSDN definition of IntPtr. It only takes one Google search to go there. What I'd like to know why IntPtr does not need the unsafe keyword? I would like to grasp the reason why we can use it without the keyword.

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

According to MSDN:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/system.intptr(v=vs.100).aspx

It is merely a representation of "a pointer or a handle."

I have been doing some reading on how the IntPtr is handled differently by the GC than other managed types, and I have not found any documentation or articles stating the IntPtr is collected any differently, i.e., as soon as the IntPtr goes out of scope it can be GC'd.

About why there is no use of the unsafe keyword read the accepted answer especially the update:

Does unsafe code have any effect on safe code?

unsafe has already been specified in the implementation of IntPtr(see the field declarations in the IntPtr implementation below), so the class using the IntPtr does not have to mark any use of IntPtr it uses as unsafe also, otherwise it would be cascaded all the way up to other classes that might use types that have unsafe code in their implementation.

Besides the unsafe code is not IntPtr, it is the field private unsafe void* m_value; that is unsafe and you are not using it directly.

// Type: System.IntPtr
// Assembly: mscorlib, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089
// Assembly location: C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\mscorlib.dll

using System.Globalization;
using System.Runtime;
using System.Runtime.ConstrainedExecution;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Runtime.Serialization;
using System.Security;

namespace System
{
  [ComVisible(true)]
  [__DynamicallyInvokable]
  [Serializable]
  public struct IntPtr : ISerializable
  {
    [SecurityCritical]
    private unsafe void* m_value;
    public static readonly IntPtr Zero;

    [__DynamicallyInvokable]
    public static int Size
    {
      [ReliabilityContract(Consistency.WillNotCorruptState, Cer.Success), TargetedPatchingOptOut("Performance critical to inline across NGen image boundaries"), __DynamicallyInvokable] get
      {
        return 4;
      }
    }

    [SecuritySafeCritical]
    [TargetedPatchingOptOut("Performance critical to inline across NGen image boundaries")]
    [ReliabilityContract(Consistency.MayCorruptInstance, Cer.MayFail)]
    [__DynamicallyInvokable]
    public IntPtr(int value)
    {
      this.m_value = (void*) value;
    }

    [SecuritySafeCritical]
    [TargetedPatchingOptOut("Performance critical to inline across NGen image boundaries")]
    [ReliabilityContract(Consistency.MayCorruptInstance, Cer.MayFail)]
    [__DynamicallyInvokable]
    public IntPtr(long value)
    {
      this.m_value = (void*) checked ((int) value);
    }

    [ReliabilityContract(Consistency.MayCorruptInstance, Cer.MayFail)]
    [SecurityCritical]
    [CLSCompliant(false)]
    [TargetedPatchingOptOut("Performance critical to inline this type of method across NGen image boundaries")]
    public IntPtr(void* value)
    {
      this.m_value = value;
    }

    [SecurityCritical]
    private IntPtr(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
    {
      long int64 = info.GetInt64("value");
      if (IntPtr.Size == 4 && (int64 > (long) int.MaxValue || int64 < (long) int.MinValue))
        throw new ArgumentException(Environment.GetResourceString("Serialization_InvalidPtrValue"));
      this.m_value = (void*) int64;
    }

    [ReliabilityContract(Consistency.MayCorruptInstance, Cer.MayFail)]
    [TargetedPatchingOptOut("Performance critical to inline across NGen image boundaries")]
    public static explicit operator IntPtr(int value)
    {
      return new IntPtr(value);
    }

    [TargetedPatchingOptOut("Performance critical to inline across NGen image boundaries")]
    [ReliabilityContract(Consistency.MayCorruptInstance, Cer.MayFail)]
    public static explicit operator IntPtr(long value)
    {
      return new IntPtr(value);
    }

    [TargetedPatchingOptOut("Performance critical to inline across NGen image boundaries")]
    [ReliabilityContract(Consistency.MayCorruptInstance, Cer.MayFail)]
    [SecurityCritical]
    [CLSCompliant(false)]
    public static explicit operator IntPtr(void* value)
    {
      return new IntPtr(value);
    }

    [TargetedPatchingOptOut("Performance critical to inline across NGen image boundaries")]
    [SecuritySafeCritical]
    [CLSCompliant(false)]
    public static explicit operator void*(IntPtr value)
    {
      return value.ToPointer();
    }

    [TargetedPatchingOptOut("Performance critical to inline across NGen image boundaries")]
    [SecuritySafeCritical]
    public static explicit operator int(IntPtr value)
    {
      return (int) value.m_value;
    }

    [TargetedPatchingOptOut("Performance critical to inline across NGen image boundaries")]
    [SecuritySafeCritical]
    public static explicit operator long(IntPtr value)
    {
      return (long) (int) value.m_value;
    }

    [SecuritySafeCritical]
    [ReliabilityContract(Consistency.WillNotCorruptState, Cer.Success)]
    [TargetedPatchingOptOut("Performance critical to inline across NGen image boundaries")]
    public static bool operator ==(IntPtr value1, IntPtr value2)
    {
      return value1.m_value == value2.m_value;
    }

    [ReliabilityContract(Consistency.WillNotCorruptState, Cer.Success)]
    [TargetedPatchingOptOut("Performance critical to inline across NGen image boundaries")]
    [SecuritySafeCritical]
    public static bool operator !=(IntPtr value1, IntPtr value2)
    {
      return value1.m_value != value2.m_value;
    }

    [TargetedPatchingOptOut("Performance critical to inline across NGen image boundaries")]
    [ReliabilityContract(Consistency.MayCorruptInstance, Cer.MayFail)]
    public static IntPtr operator +(IntPtr pointer, int offset)
    {
      return new IntPtr(pointer.ToInt32() + offset);
    }

    [TargetedPatchingOptOut("Performance critical to inline across NGen image boundaries")]
    [ReliabilityContract(Consistency.MayCorruptInstance, Cer.MayFail)]
    public static IntPtr operator -(IntPtr pointer, int offset)
    {
      return new IntPtr(pointer.ToInt32() - offset);
    }

    [ReliabilityContract(Consistency.WillNotCorruptState, Cer.Success)]
    [SecuritySafeCritical]
    internal unsafe bool IsNull()
    {
      return (IntPtr) this.m_value == IntPtr.Zero;
    }

    [SecurityCritical]
    unsafe void ISerializable.GetObjectData(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
    {
      if (info == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("info");
      info.AddValue("value", (long) (int) this.m_value);
    }

    [SecuritySafeCritical]
    [__DynamicallyInvokable]
    public override unsafe bool Equals(object obj)
    {
      if (obj is IntPtr)
        return this.m_value == ((IntPtr) obj).m_value;
      else
        return false;
    }

    [TargetedPatchingOptOut("Performance critical to inline across NGen image boundaries")]
    [SecuritySafeCritical]
    [__DynamicallyInvokable]
    public override unsafe int GetHashCode()
    {
      return (int) this.m_value;
    }

    [TargetedPatchingOptOut("Performance critical to inline across NGen image boundaries")]
    [SecuritySafeCritical]
    [ReliabilityContract(Consistency.WillNotCorruptState, Cer.Success)]
    [__DynamicallyInvokable]
    public unsafe int ToInt32()
    {
      return (int) this.m_value;
    }

    [TargetedPatchingOptOut("Performance critical to inline across NGen image boundaries")]
    [SecuritySafeCritical]
    [ReliabilityContract(Consistency.WillNotCorruptState, Cer.Success)]
    [__DynamicallyInvokable]
    public unsafe long ToInt64()
    {
      return (long) (int) this.m_value;
    }

    [SecuritySafeCritical]
    [__DynamicallyInvokable]
    public override unsafe string ToString()
    {
      return ((int) this.m_value).ToString((IFormatProvider) CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
    }

    [SecuritySafeCritical]
    [__DynamicallyInvokable]
    public unsafe string ToString(string format)
    {
      return ((int) this.m_value).ToString(format, (IFormatProvider) CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
    }

    [ReliabilityContract(Consistency.MayCorruptInstance, Cer.MayFail)]
    [TargetedPatchingOptOut("Performance critical to inline across NGen image boundaries")]
    public static IntPtr Add(IntPtr pointer, int offset)
    {
      return pointer + offset;
    }

    [TargetedPatchingOptOut("Performance critical to inline across NGen image boundaries")]
    [ReliabilityContract(Consistency.MayCorruptInstance, Cer.MayFail)]
    public static IntPtr Subtract(IntPtr pointer, int offset)
    {
      return pointer - offset;
    }

    [SecuritySafeCritical]
    [CLSCompliant(false)]
    [ReliabilityContract(Consistency.WillNotCorruptState, Cer.Success)]
    [TargetedPatchingOptOut("Performance critical to inline across NGen image boundaries")]
    public unsafe void* ToPointer()
    {
      return this.m_value;
    }
  }
}
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IntPtr is a value type. It is not Garbage Collected or handled by the collector. It is just a value-type number, that is as big as the native pointer size. – David Jeske Jul 3 at 4:27

IntPtr is a managed type and is used , i.e. to get native handles of the Windows OS. You shouldn't confuse it with an actual pointer like int*.

See MSDN for further reference.

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IntPtr represents void* and not OS-vendor related and why there are to/from methods for it. – leppie Feb 22 '13 at 11:08
    
@leppie Yes, you are right, yet, although being void* it usually represents a positive number in Windows. – bash.d Feb 22 '13 at 11:10

An IntPtr is essentially just a managed representation of a pointer type. You can freely cast any pointer types to an IntPtr in an unsafe context. Essentially an IntPtr is just a thin wrapper around a void* (IIRC it contains a private void* field).

It's commonly during interop with unmanaged code (via PInvoke or the Marshal class) as an in-place replacement for unmanaged pointer types as, like pointers, an IntPtr's size varies with architecture (4 bytes on a x86 system, 8 on a x64).

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A related question... Why doesn't dllimport require an unsafe context?

I suspect the reason IntPtr and dllimport do not require an unsafe context is to enable VB.NET (which doesn't have unsafe) to access native APIs easily.

However, there is certainly something "unsafe" about dllimport, IntPtr and their interaction.

Handing invalid arguments to a dllimport entry-point can cause a crash, or worse, silently corrupt memory. This means any code which does a dllimport is in my mind "unsafe". Further, if that code leaks an IntPtr from safe code into the dllimport entry point, it's essentially leaked it's "unsafety" out into that safe code, because the safe code could modify the IntPtr to make it invalid.

When I use dllimport, I prefer to type pointers as unsafe-struct pointers, rather than IntPtr. This has two big benefits. First, it gives me type-checking for different types of native pointers. Second, it prevents dangerous unmanaged native pointers from leaking out into "safe" code.

http://www.codeproject.com/script/Articles/ArticleVersion.aspx?aid=339290&av=638710

http://software.1713.n2.nabble.com/using-unsafe-struct-instead-of-IntPtr-with-PInvoke-td5861023.html

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