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I have a huge dict structure like this one:

my_data = {
    'key1': {
        '_': 'value1': 'aaa'
    },
    'key2': {
        '_': 'value2': 'bbb',
        'key2.1': {
            '_': 'ccc',
            'key2.1.1': {
                '_': 'ddd'
            }
        }
        'key2.2': {
            '_': 'eee',
            'key2.2.1': {
                '_': 'fff'
            }
            'key2.2.2': {
                '_': 'ggg'
            }               
        }
    }
}

and so on.

I want to display it to user in a kind of tree representation, using GTK, TK or anything to be able to browse it collapse and expand branches and probably search keys and values.

May be I do not need to develop such a tool by hands and there is already something that can visualize this kind of data out of the box?

share|improve this question
3  
If your dict only contains simple types, it will probably be easier to encode it to JSON and find a JSON viewer. –  Pavel Anossov Feb 22 '13 at 12:03
    
@PavelAnossov agree. it is a possible way to solution. –  lig Feb 22 '13 at 15:00

2 Answers 2

I do not know of a ready-to-use tool, but you could use Traits UI to swiftly develop your own

from enthought.traits.api \
    import HasTraits, Instance

from enthought.traits.ui.api \
    import View, VGroup, Item, ValueEditor

class DictEditor(HasTraits):
    Object = Instance( object )

    def __init__(self, obj, **traits):
        super(DictEditor, self).__init__(**traits)
        self.Object = obj

    def trait_view(self, name=None, view_elements=None):
        return View(
          VGroup(
            Item( 'Object',
                  label      = 'Debug',
                  id         = 'debug',
                  editor     = ValueEditor(),
                  style      = 'custom',
                  dock       = 'horizontal',
                  show_label = False
            ),
          ),
          title     = 'Dictionary Editor',
          width     = 800,
          height    = 600,
          resizable = True,
        )


def build_sample_data():
    my_data = dict(zip(range(10),range(10,20)))
    my_data[11] = dict(zip(range(10),range(10,20)))
    my_data[11][11] = dict(zip(range(10),range(10,20)))
    return my_data

# Test
if __name__ == '__main__':
    my_data = build_sample_data()
    b = DictEditor(my_data)
    b.configure_traits()

That's it. You will have a GUI like:

Traits UI uses the Model-View-Controller approach to create GUI without having the need to programatically create every widget. Here, I use the predefined ValueEditor to display arbitrary types. You can now extend it to support searching, filtering etc...enter image description here

EDIT

Simple extension to support filtering:

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
"""
Created on Fri Feb 22 12:52:28 2013

@author: kranzth
"""
from enthought.traits.api \
    import HasTraits, Instance, Str, on_trait_change

from enthought.traits.ui.api \
    import View, VGroup, Item, ValueEditor, TextEditor

from copy import deepcopy

class DictEditor(HasTraits):
    SearchTerm = Str()
    Object = Instance( object )

    def __init__(self, obj, **traits):
        super(DictEditor, self).__init__(**traits)
        self._original_object = obj
        self.Object = self._filter(obj)

    def trait_view(self, name=None, view_elements=None):
        return View(
          VGroup(
            Item( 'SearchTerm',
                  label      = 'Search:',
                  id         = 'search',
                  editor     = TextEditor(),
                  #style      = 'custom',
                  dock       = 'horizontal',
                  show_label = True
            ),
            Item( 'Object',
                  label      = 'Debug',
                  id         = 'debug',
                  editor     = ValueEditor(),
                  style      = 'custom',
                  dock       = 'horizontal',
                  show_label = False
            ),
          ),
          title     = 'Dictionary Editor',
          width     = 800,
          height    = 600,
          resizable = True,
        )

    @on_trait_change("SearchTerm")
    def search(self):
        self.Object = self._filter(self._original_object, self.SearchTerm)

    def _filter(self, object_, search_term=None):
        def has_matching_leaf(obj):
            if isinstance(obj, list):
                return any(
                        map(has_matching_leaf, obj))
            if isinstance(obj, dict):
                return any(
                        map(has_matching_leaf, obj.values()))
            else:
                try:
                    if not str(obj) == search_term:
                        return False
                    return True
                except ValueError:
                    False

        obj = deepcopy(object_)
        if search_term is None:
            return obj

        if isinstance(obj, dict):
            for k in obj.keys():
                if not has_matching_leaf(obj[k]):
                    del obj[k]

            for k in obj.keys():
                if isinstance(obj, dict):
                    obj[k] = self._filter(obj[k], search_term)
                elif isinstance(obj, list):
                    filter(has_matching_leaf,obj[k])

        return obj



def build_sample_data():
    def make_one_level_dict():
        return dict(zip(range(100),
                        range(100,150) + map(str,range(150,200))))

    my_data = make_one_level_dict()
    my_data[11] = make_one_level_dict()
    my_data[11][11] = make_one_level_dict()
    return my_data

# Test
if __name__ == '__main__':
    my_data = build_sample_data()
    b = DictEditor(my_data)
    b.configure_traits()

will give you a textbox with "filter-as-you-type". The search isn't completely correct for all cases, but you can figure out the idea.

Please note that in this sample the data in the dict are partly integers and partly strings, and both types will be found.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
nice one. will give it a try –  lig Feb 22 '13 at 15:01
    
sorry. cannot mark this as simple. after half of an hour i'm still getting NotImplemented errors from the installed modules. Nor PyPi nor official github version works. It is likely that enthought.traits.ui package works but i cannot make it work. –  lig Feb 22 '13 at 15:34
    
Which OS are you on? On Linux installation is Easy, on windows I'd recommend Python(x,y) –  Thorsten Kranz Feb 23 '13 at 7:49
    
I'm on Linux. I will be glad to see working installation guide. –  lig Feb 26 '13 at 13:49
    
If you are on Debian / Ubuntu, all you have to do is sudo apt-get install python-traitsui. I guess other distros will have it in their repositories as well, but I never tried this. –  Thorsten Kranz Feb 26 '13 at 14:14
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm finally ended up with converting my data into json as @PavelAnossov suggested and using d3 Tree Layout.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Did you conform to the "name" "children" json format as shown in the d3 link you included? If so, could you share more of the complete solution? I'm having a hard time converting my similar dict structure into that json format. –  chisaipete Apr 24 '13 at 16:51
    
That was a bunch of ugly hardcode made by my collegue at work. I dont think I'm able (and do not want) to share this proprietary piece of code anywhere. –  lig Apr 25 '13 at 17:54
    
I totally understand! Thanks for the reply--I was hoping someone had solved the issue :) –  chisaipete Apr 25 '13 at 22:08

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