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I had a class with the following methods in c#:

public MyRetType MyMethod(String p1 = null)
 {
    MyMethod(<default values>);
 } 
public MyRetType MyMethod(String p1, String p2, MyClass1 p3, String p4 = null, MyClass2 p5 = null)
 {
    ...
 } 

I have had to add a new optional parameter. To keep backwards compatibility, I have added a couple of methods with one more parameter each, and I have rewritten the previous methods to call the new ones:

 public MyRetType MyMethod(String p1 = null, IEnumerable<int> pnew = null)
 {
    MyMethod(<default values>);
 } 
 public MyRetType MyMethod(String p1) 
 {
     return MyMethod(p1, null); 
 }

 public MyRetType Launch(String p1, String p2, MyClass1 p3, IEnumerable<int> pnew , String p4 = null, MyClass2 p5 = null)
 {
    ...
 } 
 public MyRetType MyMethod(String p1, String p2, MyClass1 p3, String p4= null, MyClass2 p5 = null)
 {
     return MyMethod(p1, p2, p3, null, p4, p5);
 }

This seems to work in c#, although I am aware that calling MyMethod with just a null would be ambiguos (it could be any of the two first methods in the last listing).

However, when trying to call MyMethod from Visual Basic, it isn't listed in intellisense. If I write it manually, I got an error: "Ambiguous call".

Why does this happen?

share|improve this question
1  
What is MyMethod(<default values>); supposed to be? – Daniel Hilgarth Feb 22 '13 at 11:51
    
I would expect you to get the ambiguous call in C# too - which overload would you want called for: MyMethod("FooBar"); – Jon Egerton Feb 22 '13 at 11:53
    
@DanielHilgarth: A call to the big MyMethod with most values set to default. I don't think it matters, anyway, the problem must be in the methods signatures. – raven Feb 22 '13 at 11:53
    
@JonEgerton, right, didn't think of that. Doesn't happen, tho'. – raven Feb 22 '13 at 11:55
    
So, what should be the "right" way to overload this to keep it both user-friendly and backwards compatible? – raven Feb 22 '13 at 11:56
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to ditch the optionals and stick to the overloads - optionals are a bit meaning less if you've already got overloads that don't have the parameter that is optional:

public MyRetType MyMethod() 
{
    return MyMethod(null,null);
}

public MyRetType MyMethod(String p1) 
{
    return MyMethod(p1,null);
}

public MyRetType MyMethod(String p1, IEnumerable<int>)
{
    MyMethod(<default values>);
} 
share|improve this answer
1  
I'm very thankful for this (and Dmitry's reply too), but they don't answer the question: why? why does it work in c#? why doesn't vb allow me to use the overloads with no possible ambiguity? i.e. MyMethod(null, null) only has a valid interpretation. – raven Feb 22 '13 at 12:06
    
I suspect that at some point you'll find it doesn't work in C# either. – Jon Egerton Feb 22 '13 at 12:16
    
I planned to wait for a while just in case someone appeared with a better answer, and totally forgot about this, so I'm accepting your answer now, sorry!. As you predicted, a few tests made it fail in C# too. Thank you! – raven Jun 5 '13 at 15:19

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