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I am fetching a GZipped LXML file and trying to write Product entries to a Databse Model. Previously I was having local memory issues, which were resolved by help on SO (question). Now I got everything working and deployed it, however on the server I get the following error:

Exceeded soft private memory limit with 158.164 MB after servicing 0 requests total

Now I tried all I know to reduce the memory usage and am currently using the code below. The GZipped file is about 7 MB whereas unzipped it is 80 MB. Locally the code is working fine. I tried running it as HTTP request as well as Cron Job but it didn't make a difference. Now I am wondering if there is any way to make it more efficient.

Some similar questions on SO referred to Frontend and Backend specification, which I am not familiar with. I am running the free version of GAE and this task would have to run once a week. Any suggestions on best way to move forward would be very much appreciated.

from google.appengine.api.urlfetch import fetch
import gzip, base64, StringIO, datetime, webapp2
from lxml import etree
from google.appengine.ext import db

class GetProductCatalog(webapp2.RequestHandler):
  def get(self):
    user = XXX
    password = YYY
    url = 'URL'

    # fetch gziped file
    catalogResponse = fetch(url, headers={
        "Authorization": "Basic %s" % base64.b64encode(user + ':' + password)
    }, deadline=10000000)

    # the response content is in catalogResponse.content
    # un gzip the file
    f = StringIO.StringIO(catalogResponse.content)
    c = gzip.GzipFile(fileobj=f)
    content = c.read()

    # create something readable by lxml
    xml = StringIO.StringIO(content)

    # delete unnecesary variables
    del f
    del c
    del content

    # parse the file
    tree = etree.iterparse(xml, tag='product')

    for event, element in tree:
        if element.findtext('manufacturer') == 'New York':
            if Product.get_by_key_name(element.findtext('sku')):
                    coupon = Product.get_by_key_name(element.findtext('sku'))
                    if coupon.last_update_prov != datetime.datetime.strptime(element.findtext('lastupdated'), "%d/%m/%Y"):
                        coupon.restaurant_name = element.findtext('name')
                        coupon.restaurant_id = ''
                        coupon.address_street = element.findtext('keywords').split(',')[0]
                        coupon.address_city = element.findtext('manufacturer')
                        coupon.address_state = element.findtext('publisher')
                        coupon.address_zip = element.findtext('manufacturerid')
                        coupon.value = '$' + element.findtext('price') + ' for $' + element.findtext('retailprice')
                        coupon.restrictions = element.findtext('warranty')
                        coupon.url = element.findtext('buyurl')
                        if element.findtext('instock') == 'YES':
                            coupon.active = True
                        else:
                            coupon.active = False
                        coupon.last_update_prov = datetime.datetime.strptime(element.findtext('lastupdated'), "%d/%m/%Y")
                        coupon.put()
                    else:
                        pass
            else:
                    coupon = Product(key_name = element.findtext('sku'))
                    coupon.restaurant_name = element.findtext('name')
                    coupon.restaurant_id = ''
                    coupon.address_street = element.findtext('keywords').split(',')[0]
                    coupon.address_city = element.findtext('manufacturer')
                    coupon.address_state = element.findtext('publisher')
                    coupon.address_zip = element.findtext('manufacturerid')
                    coupon.value = '$' + element.findtext('price') + ' for $' + element.findtext('retailprice')
                    coupon.restrictions = element.findtext('warranty')
                    coupon.url = element.findtext('buyurl')
                    if element.findtext('instock') == 'YES':
                        coupon.active = True
                    else:
                        coupon.active = False

                    coupon.last_update_prov = datetime.datetime.strptime(element.findtext('lastupdated'), "%d/%m/%Y")
                    coupon.put()
        else:
            pass

        element.clear()

UDPATE

According to Paul's suggestion I implemented the backend. After some troubles it worked like a charm - find the code I used below.

My backends.yaml looks as follows:

backends:
- name: mybackend
  instances: 10
  start: mybackend.app
  options: dynamic

And my app.yaml as follows:

handlers:
- url: /update/mybackend
  script: mybackend.app
  login: admin
share|improve this question
    
HOw often do you need to import the data from the xml file. If only occasionally you would find it easier to use remote_api and process the file locally and write direct to the datastore. Then the full could be as big as you local machine can handle. –  Tim Hoffman Feb 23 '13 at 11:36
    
Also note the del c probably won't do anything unless you explicit call gc.collect() as the stuff will not probably be collected for quite some time. Also look at your code , you have the read file/StringIO, xml (which is the StringIO wrapped version of c), then the full parsed tree. You said uncompressed it's 80MB, pluse you have at least one copy you haven't gc'd plus the tree. You might consider using a pull parse strategy which would mean you don't have a full parsed tree copy in memory as well as the string. –  Tim Hoffman Feb 23 '13 at 11:41
    
Thank you Tim for your input. Yes I did consider the remote_api option but at some point this script will run at a daily rate, which is why I chose for the current setup. I will look into your suggestion on the pull parse stratgy and see if it could improve the performance. Thanks again! –  Vincent Feb 23 '13 at 16:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Backends are like front end instances but they don't scale and you have to stop and start them as you need them (or set them to be dynamic, probably your best bet here).

You can have up to 1024MB of memory in the backend so it will probably work fine for your task.

https://developers.google.com/appengine/docs/python/backends/overview

App Engine Backends are instances of your application that are exempt from request deadlines and have access to more memory (up to 1GB) and CPU (up to 4.8GHz) than normal instances. They are designed for applications that need faster performance, large amounts of addressable memory, and continuous or long-running background processes. Backends come in several sizes and configurations, and are billed for uptime rather than CPU usage.

A backend may be configured as either resident or dynamic. Resident backends run continuously, allowing you to rely on the state of their memory over time and perform complex initialization. Dynamic backends come into existence when they receive a request, and are turned down when idle; they are ideal for work that is intermittent or driven by user activity. For more information about the differences between resident and dynamic backends, see Types of Backends and also the discussion of Startup and Shutdown.

It sounds like just what you need. The free usage level will also be OK for your task.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot Paul. I'm going to try it and will post feedback once I have it. –  Vincent Feb 22 '13 at 12:31
    
So I tried to implement it but it is not recognizing the backends.yaml. I've updated the questions description. Am I missing something obvious? I will do some more testing later today. Thanks for your help! –  Vincent Feb 22 '13 at 13:04
    
that's a whole other issue. Suggest you start a different question and/or check some similar questions. E.G. have you started the back end up? –  Paul Collingwood Feb 22 '13 at 13:59
    
Thanks Paul. I didn't want to dilute SO with such a minor question, but guess you are right. Appreciate the help! –  Vincent Feb 22 '13 at 15:51

Regarding the backend: looking at the example you have provided - seems like your request is simply handled by frontend instance.

To make it be handled by the backend, try instead calling the task like: http://mybackend.my_app_app_id.appspot.com/update/mybackend

Also, I think you can remove: start: mybackend.app from your backends.yaml

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your suggestion stachern. Turns out I had to start the backend through "appcfg backends <dir> update [backend]" –  Vincent Feb 22 '13 at 16:38
    
You are right, regular deploy does not affect backend, which is basically treated as a separate version of the app. –  stachern Feb 22 '13 at 20:47

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