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As the title says: do i need to override the == operator? how about the .Equals() method? Anything i'm missing?

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Also watch out for stackoverflow.com/questions/1972262/… -- if you're not careful then comparison of your struct (a value type) to null will compile just fine but not do what you expect. –  yoyo Jan 26 at 19:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 49 down vote accepted

An example from msdn

public struct Complex 
{
   double re, im;
   public override bool Equals(Object obj) 
   {
      return obj is Complex && this == (Complex)obj;
   }
   public override int GetHashCode() 
   {
      return re.GetHashCode() ^ im.GetHashCode();
   }
   public static bool operator ==(Complex x, Complex y) 
   {
      return x.re == y.re && x.im == y.im;
   }
   public static bool operator !=(Complex x, Complex y) 
   {
      return !(x == y);
   }
}
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8  
For the curious: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/336aedhh(v=VS.71).aspx –  Mike Apr 20 '12 at 20:50
    
I wonder if it woldn't be better for performance to use Complex other = obj as Complex and then check if other == null instead of using is and then a cast... –  Clément Nov 9 '12 at 17:38
2  
@Clement: You can't do that for a struct; the result can't be null. You'd get a compile error. –  Matthew Watson Nov 26 '12 at 10:04
    
You're right, my bad. –  Clément Nov 26 '12 at 11:37
    
@MatthewWatson: I think one could use Complex? other = obj as Complex?, but nullable types are often not amenable to efficiency. –  supercat May 30 '13 at 20:08

You should also implement IEquatable<T>. Here is an excerpt from Framework Design Guidelines:

DO implement IEquatable on value types. The Object.Equals method on value types causes boxing, and its default implementation is not very effcient because it uses refection. IEquatable.Equals can offer much better performance and can be implemented so that it does not cause boxing.

public struct Int32 : IEquatable<Int32> {
    public bool Equals(Int32 other){ ... }
}

DO follow the same guidelines as for overriding Object.Equals when implementing IEquatable.Equals. See section 8.7.1 for detailed guidelines on overriding Object.Equals

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So this is only used on value types? (not reference?) –  UpTheCreek Oct 5 '09 at 8:10
    
Because reference types do not need to be boxed when passed as object, ergo, IEquatable<T> would not provide any benefit. Value types are usually copied fully onto the stack (or into the outer types layout), so to get an object reference to it, and correctly handle the lifetime of the object, it needs to be boxed (wrapped with a special type) and copied to the heap; only then the reference to the heap object can be passed to a function like Object.Equals. –  gimpf Apr 8 '13 at 15:22

Unfortunetely I don't have enough reputation to comment other entries. So I'm posting possible enhancement to the top solution here.

Correct me, if i'm wrong, but implementation mentioned above

public struct Complex 
{
   double re, im;
   public override bool Equals(Object obj) 
   {
      return obj is Complex && this == (Complex)obj;
   }
   public override int GetHashCode() 
   {
      return re.GetHashCode() ^ im.GetHashCode();
   }
   public static bool operator ==(Complex x, Complex y) 
   {
      return x.re == y.re && x.im == y.im;
   }
   public static bool operator !=(Complex x, Complex y) 
   {
      return !(x == y);
   }
}

Has major flaw. I'm refering to

  public override int GetHashCode() 
   {
      return re.GetHashCode() ^ im.GetHashCode();
   }

XORing is symmetrical, so Complex(2,1) and Complex(1,2) would give same hashCode.

We should probably make something more like:

  public override int GetHashCode() 
   {
      return re.GetHashCode() * 17 ^ im.GetHashCode();
   }
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Having hashcode collisions is not necessarily a problem. In fact you will always have a chance of a collision (read up on pigion holes/birthday paradox) In your case Complex(1,4) and Complex(4,1) collide (admittedly there were less collisions) it depends on your data. The hashcode is used to quickly weed out 99.999% of the unwanted objects (e.g., in a dictionary) The equality operators have the final say. –  DarcyThomas Dec 19 '13 at 1:15
    
That been said the more properties you have on the struct, there is a bigger chance of a collision. This may be a better hash algorithm: stackoverflow.com/a/263416/309634 –  DarcyThomas Dec 19 '13 at 1:22

The basic difference among the two is that the == operator is static, i.e. the appropriate method to invoke is determined at compile time, while the Equals method is invoked dinamically on an instance.
Defining both is probably the best thing to do, even if this matters less in the case of structs, since structs cannot be extended (a struct can't inherit from another).

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Just for completness I would also advice to overload Equals method:

public bool Equals(Complex other) 
{
   return other.re == re && other.im == im;
}

this is a real spead improvement as there is no boxing occuring of the input argument of Equals(Object obj) method

Some best prac­tices for using value types:

  • make them immutable
  • over­ride Equals (the one that takes an object as argument);
  • over­load Equals to take another instance of the same value type (e.g. * Equals(Complex other));
  • over­load oper­a­tors == and !=;
  • over­ride GetHashCode

This comes from this post: http://theburningmonk.com/2015/07/beware-of-implicit-boxing-of-value-types/

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