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I have some environment variables from Heroku and for readability, I tend to assign them to global variables for readability:

ACCESS_TOKEN = process.env.ACCESS_TOKEN

Now I'd like change value for that in tests. I have tried rewire and sandboxed-module. However, they are both setting global variables directly, whereas coffeescript variables are wrapped in anonymous function.

Is there any way around this, or do I really have to use --bare if I want to test my code?

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1 Answer 1

I'm not familiar with node, but the approach I'd use, and that I've used in other technologies is wrap up globals or external dependencies in an object which can be swapped out for a stub or mock object when needed in test.

Say rather than storing the value in ACCESS_TOKEN you made a herokuEnvironment object and gave it the method accessToken(). Wherever you need to use the properties you inject the object. Then in production that method calls process.env.ACCESS_TOKEN. If you need a safe version to inject into a test situation, you just supply { accessToken: function () {return 'foo';}}

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This is functionally equivalent to accessing process.env, only with additional layer of abstraction...and it doesn't solve my question, which is more about readability: I find it readable to annotate "global config" variables and now I can't do it because of tests. Whenever I am crippling my source because of test, I am looking around the corners. –  Almad Feb 22 '13 at 17:47
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so you put things in globals for readability, but your efforts to test objects which utilize this are hampered by the resultant coupling? I'd propose finding a way to increase readability that doesn't increase coupling. –  Jonny Cundall Feb 22 '13 at 22:47
    
Yes. When talking about configuration constants, I don't see anything wrong with them being cached into global (for readability). Coupling only harms it for testing, where I opt for complicating tests...but looks there is no way around, so I guess I have to do as you said :] –  Almad Feb 23 '13 at 15:54

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