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std::array supports aggregate initialization, but what is the problem here? If code (1) is used, both vc10.0 and g++ 4.7.2 complain that too many initializers. But if I use code (2) instead, everything is OK.

#include <array>

struct elem_t {  char c;  unsigned n;};

struct my_struct_t
{
  int i;
  // std::array<elem_t, 2> a; // (1) cause error
  // elem_t a[2]; // (2) ok
};

int main()
{
  std::array<int, 3> ai[] = {{1,2,3},{4,5,6}}; // ok

  my_struct_t var[] =
  {
    { 0, { {'a',1U}, {'b',2U}} }, // in question?
  };
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try extra braces -- you need one extra pair for the array itself:

my_struct_t var[] = { { 0, { { { 'a', 1 } } } }
                    , { 1, { { { 'c', 3 } } } }
};

//                  ^-  mystruct[]
//                     ^-  mystruct
//                         ^-  array
//                           ^-  elem_t[2]
//                             ^-  elem_t

The braces can be collapsed at the top level, but this may either be a situation where collapse isn't permitted, or compiler support may just not be there yet.

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Thanks for your quick reply. But this code will not be compiled if I use (1) instead of (2), gcc complains that "错误:类型‘char’的标量初始化带花括号". –  jgx Feb 22 '13 at 14:35
    
sorry, I mean that "this code will not be compiled if I use (2) instead of (1) ...". –  jgx Feb 22 '13 at 14:36
    
gcc complains "error: initialization 'char' type scalar with brace". –  jgx Feb 22 '13 at 14:39
    
Sorry, got the braces wrong. Current code is tested! –  Kerrek SB Feb 22 '13 at 14:41
2  
sadly, these braces depend on implementation details of std::array . An implementation of std::array is not required to have a 2-depth aggregation. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 23 '13 at 17:01

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