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I would like to setup a script which carries out logrotate on our rails apps log files and then uploads the rotated out file to s3.

The logrotate script includes /var/www/app name/.log which rotates the log file ok and appends todays date to them.

Each app has it's own production.log file which means multiple files with the same name....these then overwrite each other when they are uploaded to s3.

What is the best way around this? Ideally I would like to append the directory path to the filename so it would include the app name.

So far I have

find /var/www/*/ -name *.log -exec echo $(dirname {}) \;

For each file I get a folder name of .

What I would like bash to do is look at a file, find its location, and rename it to its full current location, so its filename would now include its directory name...eg if the file was in /var/www and was called test, the the file would now be called /var/www/var_www_tespt sorry if that isn't clear from my original post, it will be the script that is finding the file, by doing a search, so once its been found, it will need to be renamed

Thanks

Ok, had another look at this and have come up with this:-

find /tmp -name *.log| while read file; do
echo "$(dirname $file)" > /tmp/filename
sed -e 's:/:_:g' /tmp/filename > /tmp/filename1
done
test=$(cat /tmp/filename1)
cp /tmp/*.log /tmp/$test*.*.log

for example if there is a file in

/var/www/test

called test1.log then this file will become

/var/www/test/var_www_test_test1.log

But this still doesnt work......anyone got any further suggestions?

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1  
What did you try? What problem you have with what you tried? –  m0skit0 Feb 22 '13 at 14:40
    
I've also tried find /var/www/*/ -name *.log|xargs -l1 dirname which does print out the correct folder path, but not sure how to append this to the filename –  user2099762 Feb 22 '13 at 15:23
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1 Answer

You can try this

find /var/www/*/ -name '*.log' | while read file; do
  echo cp $file "$(dirname $file)/$(basename $(dirname $file)).$(basename $file)"
done

I don't know exactly how you want to construct the file names, but there you got an idea of how to use basename and dirname. And of course change the echo to a real command.

Also use quotes for *.log like '*.log', otherwise it will be expanded if there are any *.log files in the directory where you use the command.

I'm sure there are other ways of doing this. The problem with echo $(dirname {}) in the find -exec is that {} isn't defined in the subprocess when doing $(...) - I think.

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Thanks....unfortunately, the location isnt the same on each server....so if possible i'd like the full path to the file.... –  user2099762 Feb 22 '13 at 16:44
    
Ok, then you can use that instead, or what is the problem? You should edit your question with some examples of the path to the file, what filename you want to be the result etc. It's not so easy to guess what it is you want. I thought the problem was that you couldn't use {} in the $(...) –  244an Feb 22 '13 at 19:25
    
What I would like bash to do is look at a file, find its location, and rename it to its full current location, so its filename would now include its directory name...eg if the file was in /var/www and was called test, the the file would now be called /var/www/var_www_tespt sorry if that isn't clear from my original post, it will be the script that is finding the file, by doing a search, so once its been found, it will need to be renamed –  user2099762 Feb 23 '13 at 7:52
    
Edit your question and put what you wrote here in there. –  244an Feb 23 '13 at 11:52
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