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In Java, final means a variable can only be assigned to once, but that assignment can happen anywhere in the program. In C#, readonly means a field can only be assigned in a constructor, which, IMO, is significantly less useful.

As we all know, C# was heavily influenced by Java design, but this difference has always puzzled me as being very odd. Does anyone know if there's a technical reason in the CLR that resulted in the less-useful behavior of C#'s readonly vs Java's final?

EDIT:

In response to the comments; I'd like to point out that I am well aware of the benefits of immutability, and I use it all over the place. I believe readonly is less useful than Java because of this:

public class Foo 
{
    private readonly int _bar;

    Foo()
    {
        _bar = 5;
    }
}

Whoops, I actually need to initialize that value in a helper method!

public class Foo 
{
    private readonly int _bar;

    Foo()
    {
        initialize()
    }

    private void initialize()
    {
        _bar = 5; //Can't compile because of semantics of readonly
    }     
}
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closed as not constructive by Filburt, EricSchaefer, John Saunders, peer, Jodrell Feb 22 '13 at 15:12

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17  
Your "less useful" is my "more safe". –  Oded Feb 22 '13 at 14:58
2  
What are the benefits of immutability? I think you'll find readonly can be significantly useful for the compiler. You question is inherently subjective. –  Jodrell Feb 22 '13 at 14:58
2  
You cannot assing value to a final varible anywhere in the program in java as well. If you are making a static final constant then you need to give value on the spot otherwise if you are making variable as a final then you can initiate it in the constructor. –  Phoenix Feb 22 '13 at 15:00
    
@ankur.trapasiya I think OP meant that you can use final in Java on a local variable. Hence "anywhere." –  Words Like Jared Feb 22 '13 at 15:01
2  
@JohnSaunders It is not a duplicate. He is not asking about the equivalent of Java's final in C#. He shows he already knows that. I think you didn't bother to read the question, as it is completely different. –  Virtlink Feb 22 '13 at 15:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

There is a technical reason for the behavior of readonly: in the created assembly's metadata the field is marked with the initonly attribute that will ensure the field is not modified outside a constructor.1 However, while unverifiable, by taking the address of the readonly field it is still possible to change its value. Verifiable IL and C# will not allow you to do this.

At compile time it is impossible to enforce this for all methods, since the compiler would have to analyze all possible orders in which methods could be called. At runtime it would probably be a burden on the CLR and negative for performance if it had to check every field write whether it has been written to before. Instead, it is safer that C# and the CLR just don't allow the field to be assigned a value anywhere except in the carefully analyzed scope of a constructor.

In my opinion this does not make the readonly keyword any less valuable. I use it all over the place for fields whose value is provided only by the constructor (e.g. creating a list, or storing a constructor argument). C# will ensure that I won't change the field after that ever again, ensuring that I cannot accidentally set it to null or anything.

1) Thanks to Eric Lippert for pointing this out.

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@EricLippert: Thanks for pointing that out. I learn something new every day... –  Virtlink Feb 22 '13 at 15:30
    
You're welcome! –  Eric Lippert Feb 22 '13 at 15:36
    
@Virtlink Thank you for your answer. It's nice that not everyone just looks for excuses to close things. –  MgSam Feb 22 '13 at 15:38
    
@MgSam: Some people here are sensitive to subjective words, such as 'significantly less useful'. Not including such things makes your question more objective and less susceptible to closing. You can always discuss the matter on Meta. –  Virtlink Feb 22 '13 at 17:18
1  
The first paragraph is wrong. You can modify a readonly field via Reflection, using only safe C# and verifiable IL. You can even change the value of string.Empty that way. Perhaps you meant trusted code, which is a completely different concept from verifiable IL. Untrusted code cannot use (most of) Reflection, but verifiable IL can. –  Timwi Sep 17 '13 at 8:18

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