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I am trying to do a foreach on a vector of attacks, each attack has a unique ID say, 1-3.

The class method takes the keyboard input of 1-3.

I am trying to use a foreach to run through my elements in m_attack to see if the number matches, if it does... do something.

The problem I'm seeing is this:

a'for each' statement cannot operate on an expression of type "std::vector<Attack

Am I going about this totally wrong, I have C# experience and is kind of what I'm basing this on, any help would be appreciated.

My code is as follows:

In header

vector<Attack> m_attack;

In class

int Player::useAttack (int input)
{

    for each (Attack* attack in m_attack) // Problem part
    {  
        //Psuedo for following action
        if (attack->m_num == input)
        {
            //For the found attack, do it's damage
            attack->makeDamage();
        }
    }
}
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2  
You can use the function std::for_each –  andre Feb 22 '13 at 15:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

If your compiler supports C++11 ranged-based for loops, then the code is as follows:

   for (auto &attack : m_attack) // access by reference to avoid copying
    {  
        if (attack->m_num == input)
        {
            attack->makeDamage();
        }
    }

You should use const auto &attack depending on the behavior of makeDamage().

Side note: I assume you're developing on Windows based on your C# background and warning message, in which case the range-based for loop is only available in Visual Studio 2012. If you are working in Visual Studio 2010, see andre's answer for using std::for_each found in the <algorithm> header.

If you are uncomfortable using std::for_each, you can loop over m_attack using iterators:

   for (auto attack = m_attack.begin(); attack != m_attack.end(); ++attack)
    {  
        if (attack->m_num == input)
        {
            attack->makeDamage();
        }
    }

Use m_attack.cbegin() and m_attack.cend() to get const iterators.

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1  
Ah, that's the header I was searching for then, I was hunting libraries for it. Thanks. –  Springfox Feb 22 '13 at 15:46
    
That second one is just what I'm after actually, and more importantly I understand ;). Thanks for that, that's got it. –  Springfox Feb 22 '13 at 15:59
    
@Justin Shrake : May want to explain why pass by reference is probably (but not always) preferable in ranged for loops, as opposed to pass by copy. –  DavidO Feb 22 '13 at 16:08

This is how it would be done in a loop in C++(11):

   for (const auto& attack : m_attack)
    {  
        if (attack->m_num == input)
        {
            attack->makeDamage();
        }
    }

There is no for each in C++. Another option is to use std::for_each with a suitable functor (this could be anything that can be called with an Attack* as argument).

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for each is a supported extension in VS's native c++ –  Nikos Athanasiou May 3 at 21:08
    
+1 for c++11 and auto –  sotrh Aug 30 at 18:56

C++ does not have the for_each loop feature in its syntax. You have to use c++11 or use the template function std::for_each.

struct Function {
    int input;
    Function(int input): input(input) {}
    void operator()(Attack& attack) {
        if(attack->m_num == input) attack->makeDamage();
    }
};
Function f(input);
std::for_each(m_attack.begin(), m_attack.end(), f);
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This is such a help thanks, I've almost got it working but I need to make it return an int for the method. I'm trying, I have tried but can't work out how to do reference the pointer in the correct place on a return, could you possibly edit your answer to help with that? –  Springfox Feb 22 '13 at 15:47
    
@Springfox You can add extra member variables to the struct if needed and access them later using f.method(...); –  andre Feb 22 '13 at 15:49
    
why not std::begin/std::end on m_attack? –  paulm Feb 13 at 14:00
    
for each is a supported extension in VS's native c++ –  Nikos Athanasiou May 3 at 21:08

The for each syntax is supported as an extension to native c++ in Visual Studio.

The example provided in msdn

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main() 
{
  int total = 0;

  vector<int> v(6);
  v[0] = 10; v[1] = 20; v[2] = 30;
  v[3] = 40; v[4] = 50; v[5] = 60;

  for each(int i in v) {
    total += i;
  }

  cout << total << endl;
}

(works in VS2013) is not portable/cross platform but gives you an idea of how to use for each.

The standard alternatives (provided in the rest of the answers) apply everywhere. And it would be best to use those.

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