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I'm trying to write a single T-SQL script which will upgrade a system which is currently in deployment. The script will contain a mixture of:

  • New tables
  • New columns on existing tables
  • New functions
  • New stored procedures
  • Changes to stored procedures
  • New views
  • etc.

As it's a reasonably large upgrade I want the script to rollback if a single part of it fails. I have an outline of my attempted code below:

DECLARE @upgrade NVARCHAR(32);
SELECT @upgrade = 'my upgrade';

BEGIN TRANSACTION @upgrade
BEGIN
    PRINT 'Starting';
    BEGIN TRY
        CREATE TABLE x ( --blah...
        );

        ALTER TABLE y --blah...
        );

        CREATE PROCEDURE z AS BEGIN ( --blah...
        END
        GO  --> this is causing trouble!

        CREATE FUNCTION a (  --blah...

    END TRY
    BEGIN CATCH    
        PRINT 'Error with transaction. Code: ' + @@ERROR + '; Message: ' + ERROR_MESSAGE();
        ROLLBACK TRANSACTION @upgrade;
        PRINT 'Rollback complete';
        RETURN;
    END TRY
END
PRINT 'Upgrade successful';
COMMIT TRANSACTION @upgrade;
GO

Note - I know some of the syntax is not perfect - I'm having to re-key the code

It seems as though I can't put Stored Procedures into a transaction block. Is there a reason for this? Is it because of the use of the word GO? If so, how can I put SPs into a transaction block? What are the limitations as to what can go into a transaction block? Or, what would be a better alternative to what I'm trying to achieve?

Thanks

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How many times do you plan to do this? –  paul Feb 22 '13 at 15:19
    
Only the one upgrade... –  Arjun Feb 22 '13 at 15:32
1  
you should be able to wrap all of your DDL statements in one large transaction, although as mentioned you'll have to remove any GO statements. I would also advise backing up your database before you start - that way you'll have the option of the uber rollback statement, RESTORE DATABASE. –  paul Feb 22 '13 at 16:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Remove the GO and create your procedure by using dynamic sql or it will fail.

EXEC ('create procedure z 
  as
  begin
    print "hello world"
  end')

GO is not a SQL keyword, it is a batch separator. So it cannot be included into a transaction.

Please refer to those topics for further information :

sql error:'CREATE/ALTER PROCEDURE' must be the first statement in a query batch?

Using "GO" within a transaction

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms188037.aspx

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I have tried removed the GO, however I then get syntax errors on the next BEGIN block, which result in a huge number of other syntax errors chained along to the end of the script! –  Arjun Feb 22 '13 at 15:31
    
See my edit, create a procedure needs to be the first statement if not embedded in dynamic sql –  Thomas Haratyk Feb 22 '13 at 15:33
    
Will this allow multiple EXEC statments? –  Arjun Feb 22 '13 at 16:11
    
Yes you can use multiple EXEC into your transaction –  Thomas Haratyk Feb 22 '13 at 16:22

As Thomas Haratyk said in his answer, your issue was the "go". However, you can have as many batches in a transaction as you want. It's the try/catch that doesn't like this. Here's a simple proof-of-concept:

begin tran
go
select 1
go
select 2
go
rollback

begin try
    select 1
    go
    select 2
    go
end try
begin catch
    select 1
end catch
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