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In Java, C, and C++ is source code guaranteed to be executed sequentially line by line, even after compiler optimizations, within a single given thread? It seems like nothing would ever work if the system were allowed to re-order your code, but I can't seem to find any documentation guaranteeing that if I have the following in Java:

class MyClass{
String testString = "";

public MyClass(){

}

public void foo(){
    testString = "foo";
}
public void bar(){
    testString = "bar";
    testString += "r";
}
public String getTestString(){
    return testString;
}

}

class Main{
static void main(String[] args){
    MyClass testClass = new MyClass();
    testClass.foo();
    System.out.println(class.getTestString());
    testClass.bar();
    System.out.println(class.getTestString());
}
}

that the output will always be

"foo"
"barr"

and never

"foo"
"rbar"

or any other possible variation that might arise if the method invocations and statements within them are not executed sequentially as specified in the source code.

This question arose regarding Java specifically, since it gives the programmer significantly less control over what the bytecode compiler and the JIT compiler or interpreter on the target system will do to your code. The main system in question for me is Android, for which I implemented my own semaphore and mutex locking mechanisms (e.g. not making much use of the built-in Java concurrency mechanisms like 'synchronized' and 'volatile' keywords) which is more apt for my app than those provided by Java. A friend warned me however that because of the multiple levels of transformation Java goes through from source to machine code that unless I used Java's built-in concurrency mechanisms there was no guarantee that my semaphore and locking implementations would execute as I intended. That really boils down to whether or not there is a specified guarantee that, for any given runtime implementation, execution of code will be sequential within a single thread. So the main questions are:

  1. In C and C++ is code execution guaranteed to be sequential despite compiler optimizations? If not, is disabling compiler optimization enough to achieve such a guarantee?

  2. In Java is code execution guaranteed to be sequential despite potential alterations by the bytecode compiler and JIT compiler or interpreter (specifically running on Android but also for arbitrary VM implementations)?

  3. If the answers to the above are yes as I expect, are there any programming languages/platforms/contexts for which sequential execution within a single thread is not guaranteed?

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3  
In C and C++ is code execution guaranteed to be sequential despite compiler optimizations? You're opening up a whole can of worms there... –  BoBTFish Feb 22 '13 at 15:48
6  
Definitely not. The compiler rarely compiles the code you write. –  Joseph Mansfield Feb 22 '13 at 15:49
3  
In general the "as-if" rule or similar applies in this situation. The compiler might reorder and otherwise change what you write, so long as the result behaves "as-if" it were exactly what you wrote. –  FatalError Feb 22 '13 at 15:52
1  
@KyleM: It can just do that, it can execute a=4;b=5; as b=5;a=4;, as long as the perceivable state doesn't change. –  PlasmaHH Feb 22 '13 at 16:02
1  
@PlasmaHH A fair point. So it's not actually changing the order of anything that would affect the outcome, which is what I'd edit my previous statement to say if it wouldn't make this comments section confusing to read. –  KyleM Feb 22 '13 at 16:04
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6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If there is only one thread, your code will have the intuitively expected results. Any optimization must preserve the functionality before the optimization. Unexpected things can happen only if you have multiple threads.

The Java Language Specification deals basically with the counterintuitive behavior that arises when there are multiple threads, and your question is about the "intra-thread semantics" as defined here:

The memory model determines what values can be read at every point in the program. The actions of each thread in isolation must behave as governed by the semantics of that thread, with the exception that the values seen by each read are determined by the memory model. When we refer to this, we say that the program obeys intra-thread semantics. Intra-thread semantics are the semantics for single-threaded programs, and allow the complete prediction of the behavior of a thread based on the values seen by read actions within the thread. To determine if the actions of thread t in an execution are legal, we simply evaluate the implementation of thread t as it would be performed in a single-threaded context, as defined in the rest of this specification.

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/jls-17.html

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Most importantly, JIT / compiler changes instructions to optimize code execution in such a way that it does not change the results of code execution within a single given thread.

In Java, if you place your code within a sunchronized method / block it guarantees that there will be no instruction reordering.

You can find more answers in this article http://www.cs.umd.edu/~pugh/java/memoryModel/jsr-133-faq.html#otherlanguages

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Even in no threaded most compilers are allowed to re-order the code to get the best speed. But the result of re-ordering is not allowed to affect the result. In C/C++ this is called the as-if rule.

So within a function the compiler is allowed to re-order for optimization as long as the result is not affected. So we have a slight difference between "source code" and "generated code".

In threaded code will a single thread execute a function? That depends on how you define thread. What is a thread exactly (A set of stack frames/registers/and a current point of execution).

I see no problem moving a thread between cores (though I can see why a runtime would not want to do this I don't see it as imposable). So you can't assume the thread will not jump cores. But if you consider a "thread of execution" to be the current state without reference to any hardware.

What you can guarantee is that a "thread of execution" will execute from start to end of a piece of "generated code". It will not leave out any "generated code". It will execute the "generated code" in order. If it is unscheduled and re-scheduled it will continue exactly from where it left of.

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Your example would be executed sequentially, but it's more complicated than this if operands and other expressions come into play. The general rules are described here: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/jls-15.html#jls-15.7

Note the last section on the evaluation order for specific expressions: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/jls-15.html#jls-15.7.5

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Yes, the code you provided above will be executed sequentially. Your code would be executed sequentially on one thread even if there were 50 processors.

Btw, pretty sure you can't call a variable class. Even if you can, don't.

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hehe, my bad. whipped that example out in the last seconds before a meeting –  CCJ Feb 22 '13 at 19:20
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I think the simple answer is that compiler developers follow the mantra "thou shalt not modify the behavior of a single-threaded program", beyond that I think you are on your own.

"preshing on programming" has some of the best explanations of the issues with out of order execution I have ever seen. If someone knows of a better set of articles I would to know. Here are two of them but if you really want to dig into it you should check out more material on the site:

Memory Ordering at Compile Time
Weak vs. Strong Memory Models

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