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Whilst developing an object-orientated HMVC that has a super-object, at some point during the application process, it required the utilisation of namespaces. Here, namespaces will act as a method of "versioning" different code that can be accessed the same way. In the scaled down example below, I am able to execute the class Foo with the method qux if I am in version A or B. I understand that if I utilise self:: rather than $this the problem will disappear, however, I wish to avoid this. At the moment, I get the following PHP error:

Fatal error: Using $this when not in object context

So my question is, how can I use $this in this particular context?

namespace
{
    $gamma = new \Gamma();
    $gamma->execute('A', 'Foo', 'qux');

    // ...

    class Alpha
    {
        // ...
    }
    class Beta extends Alpha
    {
        public function foo($input)
        {
            echo $this->bar($input);
        }
        public function bar($input)
        {
            return $input;
        }
    }
    class Gamma extends Beta
    {
        public function execute($space, $class, $method)
        {
            call_user_func_array(array($space . '\\' . $class, $method), array());
        }
    }
}
namespace A
{
    class Foo extends \Gamma
    {
        public function qux()
        {
            $this->foo('I like turtles');
        }
    }
}
namespace B
{
    class Foo extends \Gamma
    {
        public function qux()
        {
            $this->foo('I like strawberries');
        }
    }
}

The expected output is:

"I like turtles"

Any advice, answers, guidance are much appreciated. :3

share|improve this question
    
This make no sense. You cannot use $this in static context. You should not use methods as static, if they are not explicitly defined as such. And you should not be "doing work" in the constructors. –  tereško Feb 22 '13 at 16:13
    
@tereško I am asking how it is a static context, how to avoid it being a static context and it is only an example. –  falcontoast Feb 22 '13 at 16:15
2  
You really shouldn't call functions on extended classes; the parent is not supposed to know. –  Ja͢ck Feb 22 '13 at 16:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Solved.

I was passing the class via the call_user_func_array function statically. Therefore, I was unable to use $this. Thus, an initiation of the requested class would be required, and passed through as a variable, like so:

// ... Continuing from Beta::execute() ...
$class = $space . '\\' . $class;
$class = new $class();
call_user_func_array(array($class, $method), array());
share|improve this answer

This is what abstract methods are for.

You should declare Master as an abstract class, and qux as an abstract method:

abstract class Master
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->qux();
    }
    abstract public function qux();
}

class Foo extends Master
{
    public function qux()
    {
        ....
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This works in the opposite direction.. :/ –  falcontoast Feb 22 '13 at 18:07

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