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I have designed simple JPanel extension which I was expecting will able to draw outside it's bounds:

public class JGlassPanel extends JPanel {

@Override
protected void paintBorder(Graphics g) {
}

@Override
protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
    if( getParent() != null ) {
        g.setClip(-getX(), -getY(), getX() + getWidth(), getY() + getHeight());
    }
    super.paintComponent(g);
}
}

The test of this class showed it works only partially (code below). For example, the button is drawn outside a panel, while background felt inside bounds and button visual effects also felt inside bounds.

Is it possible to extend all visual features to arbitrary area?

UPDATE

I found that overriding contains made button also function outside a panel (react on clicks). Meanwhile, visual effects and background are still inside component bounds.

USAGE CODE

public class Tester_JGlassPanel_01 {


public static void main(String[] args) {

    SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

        @Override
        public void run() {


            JButton button = new JButton("my button");
            button.setBounds(-50, -20, 100, 40);


            JGlassPanel panel = new JGlassPanel();
            //JPanel panel = new JPanel();
            panel.setLayout(null);
            panel.setBackground(Color.RED);
            panel.setBounds(100, 100, 100, 100);
            panel.add(button);

            JFrameEx frame = new JFrameEx();
            frame.setLayout(null);


            frame.add(panel);
            frame.setSize(0.5);
            frame.center();


            frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);

            frame.setVisible(true);


        }

    });

}
}
share|improve this question
    
There should never be a need for you modify the clipping rectangle of a generated graphics context (if you made it, then do as you please), Swing has already set the clipping rectangle before calling paint. You can check the clipping rectangle to determine what area is to be painted and optimise your code only update that area if you wish –  MadProgrammer Feb 22 '13 at 19:46
    
@MadProgrammer this is just a way I found; I understand modifying clip is not correct; I would like to modify the way Swing set it, but I can't –  Suzan Cioc Feb 22 '13 at 21:07
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1 Answer

I think setClip is intended only as an optimization, i.e. to make the drawing area smaller, but not larger. Swing is full of optimizations, and there are other optimizations as well in addition to setClip: the background is obviously drawn only within the bounds of a component.

So I wouldn't rely on setClip - even if you can find a tricky way to use it like this, it will break at some point.

share|improve this answer
    
So what is an alternative? –  Suzan Cioc Feb 22 '13 at 16:30
    
Well, I don't know what are you trying to achieve, but probably you can have it without having a component that is drawing outside its bounds. I guess in this case you shouldn't try to "think outside the box" :) –  lbalazscs Feb 22 '13 at 16:39
    
I would like to, but see no way. I need to extend some controls to negative coordinate values with minimal efforts. –  Suzan Cioc Feb 22 '13 at 17:03
1  
@SuzanCioc The whole purpose of components and nesting them is to reduce the scope to which they apply. If you need to draw beyond their bounds, it can mean only 2 things: 1) Your component bounds are incorrect, it is too small and/or not properly located 2) You are not drawing on the appropriate component and should do it in one of its ancestors. –  Guillaume Polet Feb 22 '13 at 17:14
    
I need to design endless coordinate board with a grid, which can be scrolled in all directions. There are 2 possible approaches: (1) write completely custom component and (2) try to reuse something from Swing. I am trying to reuse, but hitting stones all the time. These stones are thoughts of Swing creators that ZERO is minimal integer in Universe, which they hardcoded in many places without any clear reason. –  Suzan Cioc Feb 22 '13 at 17:54
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