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I'm building a template tool in PHP where I want to allow users to input html/css content into form textareas. Currently I am running:

Strip_Tags(allowing only basic html and style tags)
then:
htmlentities
then:
htmlspecialchars_decode(converting allowed tags back from <br> for example)

My form action uses the htmlentities($_SERVER['PHP_SELF']) method.

Any suggestions on what else is needed to secure this tool for online consumption? Do I need to validate, and if so what filter? Are there certain pieces of malicious code I should also strip out?

Based on the required input (html/css only), is there a best practice? I (currently) don't use databases, but would love an umbrella solution if I need to scale up.

Thanks

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closed as not constructive by Ja͢ck, Cairnarvon, john.k.doe, Andreas, Graviton Jun 17 '13 at 2:57

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Malicious in what sense? As in potentially harmful to a database or your server? Or for when you retrieve and use the input? –  Tom Walters Feb 22 '13 at 15:58
    
@Tom Malicious as in I don't want any nasty surprises, being that security is over my head! I assume I am doing enough to remove any nasty code retrieved by the functions I am running, however I am not aware of all the vulnerabilities out there. If I've effectively secured the output string, what other things could someone do to attack the server or a database (if I add one later) –  John Feb 22 '13 at 16:09
1  
The first line of protection should be escaping your strings, mysqli for instance has the method real_escape_string() which prevents any code that could be interpreted as SQL from being executed, this method is used mainly for database security. Other than that you should be good to go from a basic security standpoint. –  Tom Walters Feb 22 '13 at 16:14
    
@Tom Thanks for that. I don't need to escape any of what real_escape_string() does without a database? There's no way someone could create one and if so do anything with it? So basically I'm good with what I got, and add the real_escape_string() later when I use a database? Is that correct? –  John Feb 22 '13 at 16:46
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Essentially, you just need to make sure a user couldn't insert PHP code and have it executed on your server, e.g. ';php_info();die(); could show someone sensitive info, but so long as quotation marks and such are escaped you should be good to go –  Tom Walters Feb 22 '13 at 16:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The first line of protection should be escaping your strings, mysqli for instance has the method real_escape_string() which prevents any code that could be interpreted as SQL from being executed, this method is used mainly for database security.

You should ensure users can't execute malicious code on your server by escaping slashes, on way of doing this is by using the addslashes() function.

Other than that you should be good to go from a basic security standpoint.

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