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I create my model classes with "ADO.NET Entity Data Model" so if I change my database, my model classes will change..

My first class from "ADO.NET Entity Data Model";

public partial class TableA
    {
        public TableA()
        {
            this.TableBs = new HashSet<TableB>();
        }

        public int TableAID { get; set; }
        public string TableAName { get; set; }

        public virtual ICollection<TableB> TableBs { get; set; }
    }

My second class from "ADO.NET Entity Data Model";

    public partial class TableB
    {
        public TableB()
        {
            this.TableAs = new HashSet<TableA>();
        }

        public int TableBID { get; set; }
        public string TableBName { get; set; }
        public int TableCID { get; set; }

        public virtual TableC TableC { get; set; }
        public virtual ICollection<TableA> TableAs { get; set; }
    }

My third class from "ADO.NET Entity Data Model";

    public partial class TableC
    {
        public TableC()
        {
            this.TableBs = new HashSet<TableB>();
        }

        public int TableCID { get; set; }
        public string TableCName { get; set; }

        public virtual ICollection<TableB> TableBs { get; set; }
    }

And my ViewModel;

public class MyViewModel
{
    public TableA tableA { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<TableB> tableBs { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<TableC> tableCs { get; set; }
}

And I want to do this into my ViewModel;

    [Required]
    [Display(Name = "TableA Name")]
    [StringLength(100, ErrorMessage = "The {0} must be at least {2} characters long.", MinimumLength = 6)]
    public string TableAName { get; set; }

How can I do this??

share|improve this question
1  
you should create your models separately. And one more viewModel that is included these three models. –  AliRıza Adıyahşi Feb 22 '13 at 16:10
2  
@AliRızaAdıyahşi, very true. The BEST PRACTICE is to have Data Models and Presentation Models. dustqm, if you absolutely require Data Annotations on your DTO's, use buddy classes. –  Dave Alperovich Feb 22 '13 at 16:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

ViewModel should not use your generated domain classes (TableA).

ViewModel example for TableA will be the following class:

public class TableAViewModel {

  [Required]
  public int Id { get; set }

  [Required]
  [Display(Name = "TableA Name")]
  [StringLength(100, ErrorMessage = "The {0} must be at least {2} characters long.", MinimumLength = 6)]
  public string Name { get; set; }

  IEnumerable<TableBViewModel> TableBViewModels { get; set; }
}

In the controller you will move retrieved properties from database by TableA class into TableAViewModel class. On postback from view you will move those properties back into TableA.

You can use AutoMapper to do that (for both objects and lists of objects)

Inside your view model TableAViewModel you can add data annotations the way like in my example (taken from your class). Its your classes to use, they aren't regenerated automatically by anything and its a good practice to use view models inside your views rather than domain (database) classes.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Can I ask why you should "NOT" use the generated domain classes in the view model? Separation of concerns? –  Mark Jun 12 '14 at 22:56
    
Different purpose in life. First represent data as its being stored and retrieved (hierarchical model), the latter is dedicated to represent respective chunks of data for the view (hence called view model). They aren't necessarily 1 x 1 correlated (and shouldn't). –  Display Name Jun 13 '14 at 12:12

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