Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The Motivation

I'm attempting to save various environments via setjmp for the purpose of jumping back to them later and calling functions and making sure that the stack frames run into each other. For Example:

env[0] stack:

----------
|  text  |
----------
|  data  |
----------
|        |
|        |
|        |
|        |
|        |
|        |
|        |
|  ~~~~  |
----------

where the tildes represent the stack frames of main etc.

env[1] stack:

----------
|  text  |
----------
|  data  |
----------
|        |
|        |
|        |
|  ****  |
|  ****  |
|  ****  |
|  ****  |
|  ~~~~  |
----------

Where the stars represent a large array I've allocated.

The idea is that if I longjmp to env[0] and start running some methods, then longjmp to env[1] and start running some methods, the stack frames of env[0] will start to fill up the empty space in that array, and the stack frames of env[1] will be on top of that array, and not overwrite the stack frames of env[0]. Basic threading.

I'd also like to have more than just two threads, in fact, I'd like MAXTHREADS. Intuitively it works like this:

for(int i = 0; i < MAXTHREADS; i++) {
    char c[STACKSIZE];
    if( setjmp(env[i]) != 0 ) {
        /* Stuff that thread i will do goes here */
    }
}

Test 1

However, as you can clearly see in the following test program, each c array started at the same spot on the stack, defeating the purpose.

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    char c[10];
    printf("On Iteration %d array starts at %x and goes to %x\n",i,c,c+10);
}

Outputs:

On Iteration 0 array starts at ffbfef02 and goes to ffbfef0c
On Iteration 1 array starts at ffbfef02 and goes to ffbfef0c
On Iteration 2 array starts at ffbfef02 and goes to ffbfef0c
On Iteration 3 array starts at ffbfef02 and goes to ffbfef0c
On Iteration 4 array starts at ffbfef02 and goes to ffbfef0c
On Iteration 5 array starts at ffbfef02 and goes to ffbfef0c
On Iteration 6 array starts at ffbfef02 and goes to ffbfef0c
On Iteration 7 array starts at ffbfef02 and goes to ffbfef0c
On Iteration 8 array starts at ffbfef02 and goes to ffbfef0c
On Iteration 9 array starts at ffbfef02 and goes to ffbfef0c

This makes sense for a multitude of reasons, scope dictates that the c array ceases to exist at the end of the loop, additionally the compiler probably moves it outside of the loop because the size is static.

Test 1 gave me the size I want, but not the allocation I want

Test 2

So my next thought was to allocate an array of STACKSIZE * i, so that even though the arrays each started at the same spot, they would be bigger each time and push up my stack pointer far enough when the time came to switch to that environment. Here's the test:

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    char c[10 * i];
    printf("On Iteration %d array starts at %u and goes to %u\n",i,c,c+(10*i));
    //note: switched from %x to %u to make comparison mentally simpler
}

However, this outputs

On Iteration 0 array starts at 4290768760 and goes to 4290768760
On Iteration 1 array starts at 4290768744 and goes to 4290768754
On Iteration 2 array starts at 4290768720 and goes to 4290768740
On Iteration 3 array starts at 4290768688 and goes to 4290768718
On Iteration 4 array starts at 4290768648 and goes to 4290768688
On Iteration 5 array starts at 4290768592 and goes to 4290768642
On Iteration 6 array starts at 4290768528 and goes to 4290768588
On Iteration 7 array starts at 4290768456 and goes to 4290768526
On Iteration 8 array starts at 4290768376 and goes to 4290768456
On Iteration 9 array starts at 4290768280 and goes to 4290768370

It's a little hard to see at first, but due to the large numbers, you can focus on only the last three digits.

The first array goes from 760 to 760 -- fine, it's for i = 0

The second array goes from 744 to 754 -- fine, we moved a bit, but it's an array of size 10 in the general position that we want it in

The third array goes from 720 to 740 -- uh-oh, the array didn't start in the same spot as the others, and it's double the size.

To Illustrate the pattern on the stack, each * represents 10 chars in an array, and gaps between chunks of stars are the gaps between the arrays:

*
*
*

*
*

*
~

The tilde is the main,etc as before.

The pattern goes on. This is likely machine dependent, but my machine is allocating the arrays in order, rather than going back down the bottom each time as it did with constant size arrays.

Test 2 gave me the allocation I want, but sizes WAY larger than I'd like.

Test 3

Now having learned that my machine will allocate arrays overwriting each other if they're the same size, but stacked on top of each other if they vary in size, I thought that maybe I could allocate STACKSIZE + i instead of STACKSIZE * i of each. I ran this experiment:

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    char c[10+i];
    printf("On Iteration %d array starts at %u and goes to %u\n",i,c,c+10+i);
}

Which outputs:

On Iteration 0 array starts at 4290768808 and goes to 4290768818
On Iteration 1 array starts at 4290768792 and goes to 4290768803
On Iteration 2 array starts at 4290768776 and goes to 4290768788
On Iteration 3 array starts at 4290768760 and goes to 4290768773
On Iteration 4 array starts at 4290768744 and goes to 4290768758
On Iteration 5 array starts at 4290768728 and goes to 4290768743
On Iteration 6 array starts at 4290768712 and goes to 4290768728
On Iteration 7 array starts at 4290768688 and goes to 4290768705
On Iteration 8 array starts at 4290768664 and goes to 4290768682
On Iteration 9 array starts at 4290768640 and goes to 4290768659

After analysis, it's using the same allocation behavior I expected.

Test 3 gave me the allocation I want, and sizes close to what I want, but still not perfect

The Question

So Test 3's strategy could work in my original code up top, allocate MAXTHREADS arrays of STACKSIZE + i, saving the env between each, but it seems suboptimal. I'm allocating extra space in each array simply to trick my compiler.

Is there a better way to do this? Some other trick to make the compiler allocate fresh arrays of STACKSIZE each time?

How do I get the allocation of tests 2 and 3, with the size of test 1?

share|improve this question
    
You could maybe mark the array volatile? Then the compiler shouldn't touch it for optimization. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 22 '13 at 16:27
    
No effect. Tried it with the first test code, changed to volatile char c[10], same output. –  Jake M Feb 22 '13 at 16:30
    
You seem to believe that you are entitled to a "stack". Given the features added by the C11 standard, I believe a "graph" might be more suitable for the storage of objects with automatic storage duration. –  undefined behaviour Feb 22 '13 at 16:33
    
I just woke up so still am a little dizzy, but of course using volatile wouldn't work... The compiler would probably still reuse the same stack space inside the loop. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 22 '13 at 16:34
    
I suppose an inline asm is out of the question =( –  WhozCraig Feb 22 '13 at 17:12
show 2 more comments

1 Answer 1

You have to do something like this:

jmp_buf states[NUMTHREADS]
char stacks[NUMTHREADS][STACKSIZE];
// your scheduler starts *after* this!
for(;;) {
    // setjmp to remember the current thread's state
    // longjmp to thread i+1 and use stacks[i+1][top]
}
share|improve this answer
    
I could do that, but then I can't save the environment between each allocation. The array is a dummy array, I'm not actually putting anything in it, just using it as a mechanism to move the stack pointer before spawning threads. –  Jake M Feb 22 '13 at 16:27
    
I can't to any longjmping yet, as I haven't setjmp yet. This is where I'm doing my setjmping, ie allocate array, setjmp, allocate array, setjmp, etc. I guess I should clarify that I'm in the initialization method now, setting up before any threads have been spawned by the user. –  Jake M Feb 22 '13 at 16:32
    
You cannot move the stackpointer by having an array in the loop: In the next loop-iteration the stack will have forgotten about the "previous iteration's array" –  eznme Feb 22 '13 at 16:32
    
Run the second test code though, allocation an array of size (10 + i) moved up the stack by >= (10 + i) each time. –  Jake M Feb 22 '13 at 16:34
    
If that is so then it is machine-dependent, it is not standard however. The standard says that outside of the single iteration of the loop the array does not exist anymore. –  eznme Feb 22 '13 at 16:35
show 12 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.