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I'm selecting previous day files from huge list of files

// selecting around 80-120 files from 20,000 - 25,000 

FileInfo[] files = (new DirectoryInfo(dirPath)).GetFiles("*.xml");
 string[] selectedFiles = (from c in files
                                          where c.CreationTime >= DateTime.Today.AddDays(-1) && c.CreationTime < DateTime.Today.AddHours(-2.0)
                                          select c.FullName).ToArray();

The above takes around 4-5 mins to run, Can you please tell me how to optimize it, without changing functionality!

// file selection is between yesterday 0:00 to yesterday 22:00 <br >

as shown in code above.
Kindly advice.

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do you need to run it as sync, if not, try async –  Cuong Le Feb 22 '13 at 17:02
    
@CuongLe Means? –  Pratik Feb 22 '13 at 17:03
    
You can run this code under different thread –  Cuong Le Feb 22 '13 at 17:03
    
@CuongLe Mostly not, because its a part of some process, Unless this happens I cant proceed.Yet if have any multi threading idea, please let me know –  Pratik Feb 22 '13 at 17:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Something to try:

FileInfo[] files = (new DirectoryInfo(dirPath)).GetFiles("*.xml");

DateTime lowDate = DateTime.Today.AddDays(-1);
DateTime highDate = DateTime.Today.AddHours(-2.0);

 string[] selectedFiles = (from c in files
                                          where c.CreationTime >= lowDate && c.CreationTime < highDate
                                          select c.FullName).ToArray();

It's possible that those dates were being calculated 20,000+ times, each.

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Don't instantiate a new FileInfo class for each file if you only need to know the CreationTime. Also, you don't have to use DirectoryInfo.

I'd use something like this:

DateTime lowDate = DateTime.Today.AddDays(-1);
DateTime highDate = DateTime.Today.AddHours(-2.0);

var filteredFileNames = new List<String>();
string[] fileNames;
fileNames = Directory.GetFiles(dirPath, "*.xml")

for (int i = 0; i < fileNames.Length; i++)
{
   var creationTime = File.GetCreationTimeUtc(fileNames[i]);
   if(creationTime >= lowDate && creationTime < highDate)
   {
    filteredFileNames.Add(filenNames[i]);
   }
}

In case you're not I/O bound you can still divide up parts of the time frame into different Tasks / Threads (Depending on what .NET version you're on) and cumulate the names in the end. However, the most work done is with Directory.GetFiles. Especially if its a large directory.

When I had to handle large amounts of files in one directory, I went on using FindFirstFile/ FindNextFile and FindClose of the Win 32 API. It provides much less overhead and is a faster.

FindFirstFile Implementation

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