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I'd like to know what is best practice/pattern/opinion on where to capture date information.

Would that be in the presentation layer and sent to the server as part of the transaction metadata? Or created on the server?

My applications require a user to create a "Transaction" in one country. And others should be able to see the local time that transaction was created in another country.

Currently i'm capturing the date in the business logic layer. I think I would get the same screwy results if I were capturing it in the Data Access Layer.

Another way of putting it is what's better:

Server Side

[WebMethod()]
public TransactionItem SaveTransaction(int ID)
{
    TransactionItem transaction = new TransactionItem();
    transaction.ID = ID;
    transaction.TimeRequest = DateTime.Now; //<-- thinking this is my problem.
    new TransactionDAL().SaveTransaction(transaction);
    return transaction;
} 

OR

Client Side

[WebMethod()]
public TransactionItem SaveTransaction(int ID, DateTime TimeRequest)
{
    TransactionItem transaction = new TransactionItem();
    transaction.ID = ID;
    transaction.TimeRequest = TimeRequest; // <-- this might be better?
    new TransactionDAL().SaveTransaction(transaction);
    return transaction;
}
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2 Answers 2

First off, do yourself a favor and deal with DateTime in UTC or "Zulu time" exclusively on the server side. Handle any conversion once you get down to the client side.

// on the server side
var serverNow = DateTime.UtcNow;
Console.WriteLine(serverNow);

// and on the client side
var myLocalNow = serverNow.ToLocalTime();
Console.WriteLine(myLocalNow);

In general, your final arbiter of "What time is it?" should be the server - that's the world you have the most direct control over. Any times seen from the client's perspective should be converted from "The One True Time" which is delivered from on high by the server.

'Course, that's just my opinion, slightly influenced by being burnt many times over dealing with Local->Server time conversions. (ugh)

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure this will work. If you create a transaction within my application in NY, fly to LA and open the application It will say that you created that transaction 3 hours earlier than it was actually created just because you traveled. I need it so that if you create it at 3 am NY Time, then fly to LA, it will still say 3 am NY time. –  capdragon Mar 21 '13 at 18:15
1  
@capdragon Then I absolutely recommend UTC time - just when you save your "transaction date", also save the time zone of the client - then you can do the fiddling as your usage requires. –  JerKimball Mar 21 '13 at 19:11
    
Absolutely with JK on UTC, make the Client Time Zone capture part of an atomic action with the transaction. –  Martin Spamer Mar 22 '13 at 16:46

If you need to track events in the client's local time, you really have no choice but to capture that on the client. For .NET (which I'm guessing you're using since your sample code looks like C#), DateTimeOffset provides a much more convenient mechanism for this than using a DateTime coupled with separately tracked time zone information.

Unfortunately, capturing timestamps on the client introduces potential problems with server-side processing (including potential security issues) if there is a discrepancy between the client and server system times. The easy way to address this is to compare the client-captured time with the current server time and reject it if it falls outside some tolerance gap (e.g.: 5 min in either direction of the server time). Even if it passes this test, you should not store the client-captured timestamp directly. Instead, you should use the server current time translated to the time zone of the client.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this should work. So I'll capture the timezone on the client, send the timezone to the server and capture the time on the server and translate it to that client timezone. –  capdragon Mar 21 '13 at 18:17

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