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Got any ideas why this code doesn't work?

#include <stdio.h>

char* get_name()
{
    char string[4];

    string[0] = 'A';
    string[1] = 'N';
    string[2] = 'A';
    string[3] = '\0';

    return string;
}


int main()
{
    char *name = get_name();

        printf("%s \n", name);

        return 0;
}

Thank you.

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1  
You're returning a pointer to a variable in the stack of a function. –  Tom Feb 22 '13 at 17:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your code fails because you are returning a pointer to a variable that immediately goes out of scope. You are returning a pointer to a local variable. Local variables have scope that ends when the function returns. So it is an error to attempt to refer to them after the scope has ended.

You'll need to use malloc to allocate the string. That way you can allocate an object whose lifetime survives the end of the function.

char* get_name()
{
    char *string = malloc(4);
    strcpy(string, "ANA");
    return string;
}

Remember that you need to match every call to malloc with a call to free.

char *name = get_name();
printf("%s \n", name);
free(name);

I've also omitted error checking here to simplify things.

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It is not the scope of the identifier that is important; it is the lifetime of the object. E.g., the identifier of a static object defined inside the function also goes out of scope when the function returns, but the object’s lifetime persists. –  Eric Postpischil Feb 22 '13 at 17:13
    
@Eric Yes, I was sloppy in my terminology. I think it's perhaps easier for the person asking to understand "local variables" than "objects with automatic storage". Or is there a better and simpler way to say it? –  David Heffernan Feb 22 '13 at 17:17
    
You could say it is a temporary variable whose contents are not guaranteed after the function returns. –  Eric Postpischil Feb 22 '13 at 20:18
    
@Eric I don't really think that's any better. As you say, it's not the variable that is important, but the object. Technically speaking it is an object with automatic storage. But I think the language in my answer is clear enough to get the message across. –  David Heffernan Feb 22 '13 at 20:23
    
I was addressing the scope/lifetime issue, not an issue about calling things “variables” versus objects. The normative part of the C 2011 standard does not refer to objects as “variables” except in a few places in the library discussion, which I expect were inadvertent. If you also want to avoid that, you could say it is a temporary object whose contents are not guaranteed after the function returns. –  Eric Postpischil Feb 22 '13 at 20:31

string is a local variable. When you return from get_name, this variable doesn't exist anymore.

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