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I have the following class:

public class test
{
    private int i;
    public test(int in)
    {
        i = in;
    }
    public int testint;
    {
        get { return i; }
        set { i = testint; }
    }
}

And the following code:

test[] data = new test[3];
for(int j = 0; j < 3; j++)
{
    data[i] = new test(0);
    data[i].testint = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
}
Console.WriteLine(test[0].testint);
Console.WriteLine(test[1].testint);
Console.WriteLine(test[2].testint);

When I run this program and type in 1, 2, 3 as the input, the output is 0, 0, 0. I don't understand why the get or set seem to be not working. If I initialize the array elements with a value other than 0, the output will be that. The data[i].testint = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine()); seems to not be working. How would I go about doing something like that?

share|improve this question
    
in is c# keyword. –  Hamlet Hakobyan Feb 22 '13 at 17:40
1  
That setter doesn't look right. –  Brian Rasmussen Feb 22 '13 at 17:40

5 Answers 5

Change the set method to this:

public int testint
{
   get { return i; }
   set { i = value; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
so it did, cheers. –  Marvin Rounce Feb 22 '13 at 17:54

You setter is incorrect. It should be:

 set { i = value; }

You had:

 set { i = testint; }

Which only triggers the getter, which gets from i, so in the end your setter was doing i = i .

In a setter, the value keyword contains the new candidate value for the property. value's type equals the property's. I say candidate value because you can validate it and choose to not apply it.

In your case, you were not applying the value.

Update

Also, when defining getters and setters, no semicolon should be used. Code, then, would look like this:

public int testint
{
    get { return i; }
    set { i = value; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This only addresses one of the syntax errors pointed out in my answer. –  Jonathan Wood Feb 22 '13 at 17:53
    
@JonathanWood You are right. No need to downvote, though. Answer is fixed. –  Adrian Carneiro Feb 22 '13 at 19:09
    
Whether there was reason to downvote or not, I didn't downvote your answer. –  Jonathan Wood Feb 22 '13 at 19:14
    
@JonathanWood It's cool though, at least the answer is more complete now. Hope it helps OP and future browsers –  Adrian Carneiro Feb 22 '13 at 19:17

I see two errors in this code:

public int testint;
{
    get { return i; }
    set { i = testint; }
}

There should be no semicolon after testint at the top. Also, set needs to assign using value, like this:

public int testint
{
    get { return i; }
    set { i = value; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Allow me to just disagree a little. There are not 2 syntax errors: there's one syntax error and one semantic error. The setter is not syntactically wrong. –  Adrian Carneiro Feb 22 '13 at 19:15

Change your setter to say:

set { i = value; }

value corresponds to the value you send to set the variable.

share|improve this answer

Here's simple way.

public int TestInt {get; set;}
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