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I have 3 files - String (for getting chars and assembling them into a string (as a pointer, but not array)), the LinkedList file and main (test file). The String part works fine, it's tested. But I got stuck on the LinkedList.

----> I know the problem is in the addString() method and it's a problem in the logic, because I put a print-check at the end of it and I never get there. But I don't seem to find any logical problem... Here's the code for the LinkedList:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "LinkedList.h"

struct node
{
    struct node *next;
    struct node *previous;
    struct string *str;
};

static struct node *head;
static struct node *tail;

int count = 0;

void initList()
{
    head = NULL;
    tail = NULL;
}

void addString(struct string *str_)
{
    struct node *current = malloc(sizeof(struct node));
    if (head = NULL)
    {
        head = current;
        tail = current;
        current->next = tail;
        current->previous = head;
        current->str = str_;
    }
    else
    {
        current->previous = tail;
        tail->next = current;
        tail = current;
        current->str = str_;
    }

    puts("\nA string has been added!");

}

void deleteString(int index)
{
    struct node *currentNode;
    currentNode = head;
    int i = 0;

    if(index == 0)
    {
        head->str = NULL;
        head->next = head;
        // delete first node and relocate "head" to next node
    }
    while(currentNode != NULL)
    {
        if(i == index)
        {
            currentNode->str = NULL;
            currentNode->previous->next = currentNode->next;
            currentNode->next->previous = currentNode->previous;
        }
        else
        {
            currentNode = currentNode->next;
            i++;
        }
        // 1.loop through and starting from 0 as first (head) element
        // 2.when index is reached - delete it and replace the connections
    }
}

void printAll()
{
    struct node *currentNode;
    currentNode = head; 

    while(currentNode !=NULL)
    {
        printf("%s", currentNode->str);
        currentNode = currentNode->next;
    }// need to iterate through list
}

and here is the test file:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#include "String.h"
#include "LinkedList.h"

int main(int argc, char** argv) {

    initList();

    char* c;
    c = getChars();

    struct string *strp1;
    strp1 = malloc(sizeof(struct string));
    strp1 = make_string(c);
    addString(strp1);
    printAll();

    printf("%s", *strp1);
    puts("\nsome text");
    return (EXIT_SUCCESS);
}
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closed as too localized by Lightness Races in Orbit, hohner, David W, Emil, Mario Feb 22 '13 at 22:57

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Please make your title describe the problem. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 22 '13 at 18:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As eduffy mentioned in your addString function you should do a comparison instead of an assignment. The other problem is setting currentNode->next and currentNode->previous. In your printAll() function you iterate until currentNode == NULL, which given that currentNode->next = current node you will have an infinite loop. Leave currentNode->next/previous as NULL until you have more than 1 element.

share|improve this answer

(head = NULL) is an assignment statement, not a comparison. Change it to (head == NULL).

BTW, since it looks like you're just starting out with C, turn up the warning in your compiler flags. Don't run your code until you've fixed all the warnings.

share|improve this answer
    
And ask how to turn on warnings with your compiler if you can't find out how from manual/with google. For gcc, use switches: -Wall -Wextra –  hyde Feb 22 '13 at 18:09

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