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What is the best way to merge the following two arrays into a multidimensional array?

x = ['A', 'B', 'C']
y = ['D', 'E', 'F']

Desired result:

z = [['A', 'D'], ['A', 'E'], ['A', 'F'], ['B', 'D'], ['B', 'E'], ['B', 'F'], ['C', 'D'], ['C', 'E'], ['C', 'F']]
share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can use Array#product:

x = ['A', 'B', 'C']
y = ['D', 'E', 'F']

result = x.product(y)

puts result.inspect
share|improve this answer
    
I was waiting for somebody to come along and blow my answer out of the water. A begrudging +1. :) – Jason Swett Feb 22 '13 at 18:33
    
Wow. That's exactly what I was looking for. I was looking through the Ruby Core API and somehow missed this one. – ardavis Feb 22 '13 at 18:33
    
@JasonSwett I definitely learned from your solution. A +1 to you as well. ^_^ – Chris Knadler Feb 22 '13 at 20:33

Here's one way, although not necessarily the simplest possible way:

x = ['A', 'B', 'C']
y = ['D', 'E', 'F']

result = []

x.each do |x|
  y.each do |y|
    result << [x, y]
  end
end

puts result.inspect

Update: here's a more concise way:

x = ['A', 'B', 'C']
y = ['D', 'E', 'F']

puts x.map { |x|
  y.map { |y| [x, y] }
}.inspect
share|improve this answer
    
This might be the best way. I could replace your y.each with result << y.map{|item| [item, x] } I believe. – ardavis Feb 22 '13 at 18:27
    
Thanks for looking into that. I'll accept your answer when it lets me. I appreciate your assistance. – ardavis Feb 22 '13 at 18:29
1  
No problem. Another thought, and maybe you already know about this, but I might personally use collect, an alias for map, instead of map here. Even though the two functions do the same exact thing, I find the collect name to be more intent-revealing in these kinds of cases. – Jason Swett Feb 22 '13 at 18:31
    
Okay, I was going to accept this, but the other answer does exactly what I wanted in the most concise way possible. Using #product seems to be the trick. Thanks again. – ardavis Feb 22 '13 at 18:33
    
Or, even better, use the other guy's better answer. – Jason Swett Feb 22 '13 at 18:33

Another way of doing it is like this:

x = ['A', 'B', 'C']
y = ['D', 'E', 'F']

print x.concat(y).each_slice(2).to_a    # => [["A", "B"], ["C", "D"], ["E", "F"]]
share|improve this answer
    
Isn't that the same as x.zip(y)? – orde Feb 22 '13 at 18:42

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