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I have just created my first MVC 3 project for a database search using EF db first, but the search is only a part of a big website most of the pages will just contain some text and images.

My question is basically about these pages which on the website would be .aspx, and the code behind would have nothing at all.

They use a master page and some user controls - my guess is that's the reason our front end person made them aspx not html.

I need to convert/include her pages into my project (I don't want to go back to stored procedures and listview after having used EF and Linq, plus I don't have time).

I know of one possible way: create a controller for each of the main menu items, then add ActionResult named for each of the submenu items returning View(), then create respective views.

 public class LearnAboutStandardsController : Controller
    {

        public ActionResult Index()
        {
            return View();
        }
        public ActionResult ITSStandardsBackground()
        {
            return View();
        }
        public ActionResult ResearchInitiatives()
        {
            return View();
        }

So my static content pages will become Views.

It's working, I just want to do it for the rest of the pages and modify the links in the text of these pages.

Is there any other way to handle these pages?

There is no logic behind these pages.

I know this was not a perfect project for the MVC pattern with so much static content, but I had my reasons for it.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Personally, I would have controllers with simple actions that just render views. That way if you do add more features later you're already set up. And if you want to add security or caching it's a lot easier and more consistent.

You can still use WebForms (with the new Friendly URLs feature if you want "pretty" URLs) for the "static" pages. Or you can use Web Pages with Razor and create CSHTML files for the static content.

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If I use webforms, I'll have to maintain 2 master pages (I already have my shared/_Layout.cshtml), correct? I've been reading about combining aspx and MVC, and having controller with simple actions seems much easier to implement, it would be a copy-paste from the .aspx into views. I'm glad to hear it is the right choice... I don't know how to use separate cshtml - which item to pick Add->New Item -> ???, where to put them and how to route. – knit Feb 22 '13 at 19:28

I handle this with an "StaticContent" controller:

StaticContentController.cs

public class StaticContentController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult About()
    {
        return View();
    }

    public ActionResult Services()
    {
        return View();
    }

    public ActionResult Portfolio()
    {
        return View();
    }
}

Add the code below your route config to handle the static routes:

routes.MapRoute(
    "StaticContent",
    "{action}",
    new { controller = "StaticContent" },
    new { action = "About|Services|Portfolio" } // Add more here
);

You're set.

If you need more pages just add the action in the StaticController and adjust your StaticContent MapRoute.

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