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To make it short I want to design a java applet that shows a traffic light with three adjacent buttons. One that says red light, one that says amber light and one for green.


My problem is: is that I don't know how to link each button with the right oval. All of the ovals belong to the same Graphics variable g. If I change the color all three would be changed.

There is a superclass called canvas that helps separate each object in its own entity from my knowledge but I know there is an easier way.

How can I do this?

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import java.applet.*;
import java.applet.Applet;

public class Traffic extends Applet
    implements ActionListener
{

    int colourNum; //global variable which is responible for changing the light

    Button bttn1 = new Button ("Stop Traffic");
    Button bttn2 = new Button ("Caution");
    Button bttn3 = new Button ("Proceed");

    public void init ()
    {
        setBackground (Color.lightGray);

        bttn1.addActionListener (this); // stop light
        bttn2.addActionListener (this); // yellow light
        bttn3.addActionListener (this); // green light

        add (bttn1);
        add (bttn2);
        add (bttn3);
    }

    public void paint (Graphics g)  // responsible for graphics "within" the window
    {
        g.setColor (Color.black);

        switch (colourNum)
        {
            case 1:
                g.setColor (Color.red);
                break;
        }
        g.fillOval (30, 40, 20, 20); // red light
        g.fillOval (30, 70, 20, 20); // yello light
        g.fillOval (30, 100, 20, 20); // green light
    }


    public void actionPerformed (ActionEvent evt)
    {
        if (evt.getSource () == bttn1)
            colourNum = 1;
        else if (evt.getSource () == bttn2)
            colourNum = 2;
        else
            colourNum = 3;

        repaint ();
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
You should avoid overriding paint on top level containers like Appet. You should also be calling super.paint to honour the paint chain –  MadProgrammer Feb 22 '13 at 19:29
    
It would be better to create new Canvas-based components to individually handle the painting of the traffic signals. –  Reimeus Feb 22 '13 at 19:30
    
The best strategy might be to have a TrafficLights class that knows how to draw itself and its state (e.g. red, green, blinking yellow. When it comes time to draw it. Call TrafficLights.draw(Graphics) from within paint in order to paint the current state. –  Andrew Thompson Feb 22 '13 at 19:31
    
BTW - Why AWT rather than Swing? (last millennium) Why an Applet rather than a Frame or JFrame? (easier) –  Andrew Thompson Feb 22 '13 at 19:33
    
SWT is overrated Andrew... –  Fryon Alexandra Feb 23 '13 at 1:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
public void paint (Graphics g)  // responsible for graphics "within" the window
{
    g.setColor (Color.black);

    g.setColor(colourNum == 1? Color.red : Color.red.darker().darker());
    g.fillOval (30, 40, 20, 20); // red light
    g.setColor(colourNum == 2? Color.yellow : Color.yellow.darker().darker());
    g.fillOval (30, 70, 20, 20); // yello light
    g.setColor(colourNum == 3? Color.green : Color.green.darker().darker());
    g.fillOval (30, 100, 20, 20); // green light
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thankyou so much! –  Fryon Alexandra Feb 23 '13 at 1:06

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