Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am getting a DER encoded certificate (after base64 decode) from an ldap search request and need to parse the public key from it. I am pretty sure that its possible with the openssl library. Unfortunately the API documentation is not very well-kept. Is there any example or other library to extract the information?

share|improve this question
    
if you really wanted to just do the grind-work the asn1 library in openssl could be used. However, I would strongly advise you step it up a little higher in the library and use the cert-code, which is pretty amazing. – WhozCraig Feb 22 '13 at 20:19

Use d2i_X509 to get the certificate in X509 * structure. After that use X509_get_pubkey to get the public key. X509_get_pubkey will give you public key in EVP_PKEY * structure. I hope this must solve your purpose.

If your certificate is in PEM format (Base64 encoded wrapped by "-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----") , then you can also use PEM_read_X509 to get X509 * object directly.

Example:

//Get the X509 object.
//Say certificate is encoded in a file
X509 * xcert = PEM_read_X509(fp, NULL, NULL, NULL);

//or assuming DER encoded certificate in buf with length of buffer is buflen.
X509 * xcert = d2i_X509(NULL, buf, buflen);

//Get the public key.
EVP_PKEY * pubkey = X509_get_pubkey(xcert);


//later free this pubkey object when no longer required.
EVP_PKEY_free(pubkey);
share|improve this answer

You can try to use the d2i_X509 API to decode the DER encoded certificate. It gives you an X509 structure from which you should be able to get the public key.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.