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Consider the popular container problem:

We have three containers, one is 10 liters, one is 7 liters, and one is 4 liters. The 10 liter container is empty and the 7 and 4 liter containers are full. Enumerate the method by which you can reach -some other state- by only pouring the contents of one container into another until a) the pouring container is empty or b) the receiving container is full.

For a homework assignment (that I've already completed), we were supposed to discuss how we could interpret this class of problems as a graph, and then what algorithms we would run on the graph in order to find the solution.

My question is rather how can we produce a graph of all possible states of the three containers given certain initial conditions? For a given set of containers there may be N possible states, but I imagine there are M disjoint states, that are impossible to reach from the initial conditions. So how do we find the N - M vertices of the valid graph, and the edges connecting those vertices?

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1 Answer 1

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A graph has nodes and edges.

Nodes imply a state. That is, the state of all your containers

Edges imply a (valid) transition between states.

If you can enumerate all the ways to change a state, then you can enumerate all the outgoing edges of a node to other nodes.

Using the containers as an example:

State: 10 liter container (some amount inside), 7 liter container(some amount inside), and 4 liter container(some amount inside)

State transition function(s):

  • Pour the contents of the 4 liter container into the 7 liter container
  • Pour the contents of the 7 liter container into the 10 liter container
  • Pour the contents of the 4 liter container into the 10 liter container
  • Pour the contents of the 7 liter container into the 4 liter container
  • Pour the contents of the 10 liter container into the 4 liter container
  • Pour the contents of the 10 liter container into the 7 liter container

Constraint on these functions: One pours until the pouring container is empty, or the receiving container is full.

You have n containers, and potentially (n choose 2) interactions between those containers.

Calling any one of these functions may transition you into another state.

You may define a cost associated with each edge transition. In simple problems like this, all your edge transition functions have the same cost (1), but in a real-world example like moving between cities on a map, the cost might be the distance you would have to travel along an edge.

Perhaps you want to minimize pouring out the 4 liter container. You can assign edge weights of 2 instead of 1 for all edges that involve pouring the 4 liter container into any other one.

Now that we have defined our graph in terms of nodes and edges, we can search it!

Perhaps you have some starting state like the one you mentioned (the 10 liter container is empty and the 7 and 4 liter containers are full). And you want to get to some other state (the 10 liter container is full, the 7 liter container is empty and the 4 liter container has 1 liter). You can search your graph starting at the initial state, and stop your search when you reach the goal.

There traditional graph search techniques are Breadth-First Search (BFS) and Depth-First Search (DFS). I'll let you go to wikipedia to learn them. Other graph search techniques like A* define a heuristic or rule of thumb for trying to get to the goal state the quickest. The heuristic involves estimating how much longer you have until you're at the goal, and there's all sorts of research into defining heuristics for specific problems (coming up with heuristics can be really hard!)

Actually producing the graph that you want to then search later can be accomplished via the BFS or DFS method described earlier. Simply put, create a node that describes your initial conditions, and then apply all your state transition functions on it to produce all reachable nodes. Place those nodes in a list (these are nodes that have been generated but not yet expanded). For each element in your list, expand it in the same way. Place nodes you've finished expanding into a closed list so that you can ensure you never try to generate the same node twice.

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Perhaps I was unclear, but I am wondering how to produce the graph to be searched, not just search the already extant graph. Or are you saying that we a BFS or DFS would be sufficient to produce the graph? –  Ty Larrabee Feb 22 '13 at 22:11
    
@TyLarrabee A BFS and DFS would be sufficient to produce the graph. At least, the graph of all nodes reachable from the start node. –  AndyG Feb 22 '13 at 23:31
    
Alrighty. Thanks for your help! –  Ty Larrabee Feb 23 '13 at 7:00

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