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I am about to add a section to an ASP.NET app (VB.NET codebehind) that will allow a user to get data returned to them as an Excel file, which I will generate based on database data. While there are several ways of doing this, each has its own drawbacks. How would you return the data? I'm looking for something that's as clean and straightforward as possible.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Andrew Barber Jul 7 '13 at 1:29

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

26 Answers

up vote 104 down vote accepted

CSV

Pros:

  • Simple

Cons:

  • It may not work in other locales or in different Excel configurations (i.e. List separator)
  • Can't apply formatting, formulas, etc

HTML

Pros:

  • Still pretty Simple
  • Supports simple formating and formulas

Cons:

  • You have to name the file as xls and Excel may warn you about opening a non native Excel file
  • One worksheet per workbook

OpenXML (Office 2007 .XLSX)

Pros:

  • Native Excel format
  • Supports all Excel features
  • Do not require an install copy of Excel
  • Can generate Pivot tables
  • Can be generated using open source project EPPlus

Cons:

  • Limited compatibility outside Excel 2007 (shouldn't be a problem nowadays)
  • Complicated unless you're using a third party component

SpreadSheetML (open format XML)

Pros:

  • Simple compared to native Excel formats
  • Supports most Excel features: formating, styles, formulas, multiple sheets per workbook
  • Excel does not need to be installed to use it
  • No third party libraries needed - just write out your xml
  • Documents can be opened by Excel XP/2003/2007

Cons:

  • Lack of good documentation
  • Not supported in older versions of Excel (pre-2000)
  • Write-only, in that once you open it and make changes from Excel it's converted to native Excel.

XLS (generated by third party component)

Pros:

  • Generate native Excel file with all the formating, formulas, etc.

Cons:

  • Cost money
  • Add dependencies

COM Interop

Pros:

  • Uses native Microsoft libraries
  • Read support for native documents

Cons:

  • Very slow
  • Dependency/version matching issues
  • Concurrency/data integrity issues for web use when reading
  • Very slow
  • Scaling issues for web use (different from concurrency): need to create many instances of heavy Excel app on the server
  • Requires Windows
  • Did I mention that it's slow?
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1  
The "Write-only" constraint mentioned for SpreadsheetML is not fully an issue, since you can save an excel file as SpreadsheetML if you wish. –  Brian Aug 7 '09 at 13:08
    
SpreadsheetML may crash Excel 2003 if you create big files with it. Don't trust it :/ –  Brian Aug 17 '09 at 14:50
1  
You can Save back to a SpreadsheetML file just fine in Office 2002 and 2003. No Save As required. SpreadsheetML cannot store macros, charts, graphics, and a few other odds and ends, including the new features of Office 2007 (e.g., more than 3 conditional formats). Since XML is verbose, Zipping SpreadsheetML before sending from the server (using SharpZipLib is an option) works great to reduce download times--actually, it should be mentioned that OpenXML is stored in a ZIP container anyway. @Brian: I use complex SpreadsheetML in the 50-100MB range on a daily basis without crashing problems. –  richardtallent Aug 18 '09 at 22:37
1  
Very nice overview –  chiccodoro Apr 16 '10 at 9:08
1  
@pomarc: It might be straightforward, but it's not clean. The user wants an Excel file and you give him an HTML file with a fake extension. –  Heinzi Sep 6 '10 at 9:19
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You can output the data as html table cells, stick a .xls or .xlsx extension on it, and Excel will open it as if it were a native document. You can even do some limited formatting and formula calculations this way, so it's much more powerful than CSV. Also, outputting an html table ought to be pretty easy to do from a web platform like ASP.Net ;)

If you need multiple worksheets or named worksheets within your Excel Workbook, you can do something similar via an XML schema called SpreadSheetML. This is not the new format that shipped with Office 2007, but something completely different that works as far back as Excel 2000. The easiest way to explain how it works is with an example:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<?mso-application progid="Excel.Sheet"?> 
<Workbook xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:spreadsheet"
        xmlns:o="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office"
        xmlns:x="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:excel"
        xmlns:ss="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:spreadsheet"
        xmlns:html="http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40">
<DocumentProperties xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office">
      <Author>Your_name_here</Author>
      <LastAuthor>Your_name_here</LastAuthor>
      <Created>20080625</Created>
      <Company>ABC Inc</Company>
      <Version>10.2625</Version>
</DocumentProperties>
<ExcelWorkbook xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:excel">
        <WindowHeight>6135</WindowHeight>
        <WindowWidth>8445</WindowWidth>
        <WindowTopX>240</WindowTopX>
        <WindowTopY>120</WindowTopY>
        <ProtectStructure>False</ProtectStructure>
        <ProtectWindows>False</ProtectWindows>
</ExcelWorkbook>

<Styles>
      <Style ss:ID="Default" ss:Name="Normal">
            <Alignment ss:Vertical="Bottom" />
            <Borders />
            <Font />
            <Interior />
            <NumberFormat />
            <Protection />
      </Style>
</Styles>

<Worksheet ss:Name="Sample Sheet 1">
<Table ss:ExpandedColumnCount="2" x:FullColumns="1" x:FullRows="1" ID="Table1">
<Column ss:Width="150" />
<Column ss:Width="200" />
<Row>
      <Cell><Data ss:Type="Number">1</Data></Cell>
      <Cell><Data ss:Type="Number">2</Data></Cell>
</Row>
<Row>
      <Cell><Data ss:Type="Number">3</Data></Cell>
      <Cell><Data ss:Type="Number">4</Data></Cell>
</Row>
<Row>
      <Cell><Data ss:Type="Number">5</Data></Cell>
      <Cell><Data ss:Type="Number">6</Data></Cell>
</Row>
<Row>
      <Cell><Data ss:Type="Number">7</Data></Cell>
      <Cell><Data ss:Type="Number">8</Data></Cell>
</Row>
</Table>
</Worksheet>

<Worksheet ss:Name="Sample Sheet 2">
<Table ss:ExpandedColumnCount="2" x:FullColumns="1" x:FullRows="1" ID="Table2">
<Column ss:Width="150" />
<Column ss:Width="200" />
<Row>
      <Cell><Data ss:Type="String">A</Data></Cell>
      <Cell><Data ss:Type="String">B</Data></Cell>
</Row>
<Row>
      <Cell><Data ss:Type="String">C</Data></Cell>
      <Cell><Data ss:Type="String">D</Data></Cell>
</Row>
<Row>
      <Cell><Data ss:Type="String">E</Data></Cell>
      <Cell><Data ss:Type="String">F</Data></Cell>
</Row>
<Row>
      <Cell><Data ss:Type="String">G</Data></Cell>
      <Cell><Data ss:Type="String">H</Data></Cell>
</Row>
</Table>
</Worksheet>
</Workbook> 
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10  
you could rename the file with an .xml extensio and add this: <?mso-application progid="Excel.Sheet"?> just after the <?xml version="1.0"?> this way windows recognize that the file is an Excel file, will give it the right icon, will open excel when you click the file and Excel will not complain that the file format and contents do not match. bye. –  pomarc May 22 '09 at 11:00
1  
@pomarc The downside to that is that other programs that import excel files won't recognize it. But then, they probably wouldn't parse the xml anyway. –  Joel Coehoorn Mar 24 '10 at 16:03
1  
I have used this technique quite successfully. This would be my recommendation - dirt simple and very effective. –  NealB Oct 8 '10 at 16:34
    
Two potential issues (YMMV) with HTML tabular data masked as XLS file: (1) Microsoft Excel will trim leading spaces and zeroes automatically; and (2) Microsoft Excel 2010 warns the user when opening an XLS file containing HTML tabular data. The solution to #1 seems to be creativyst.com/Doc/Articles/CSV/CSV01.htm#CSVAndExcel (if leading spaces/zeroes are significant and need to be retained). –  schultkl Jul 30 '11 at 18:33
    
Just for clarification, while I did mention HTML tables, the main point of this answer is SpreadsheetML, which is more than just HTML tabular data. Excel sees it as native. –  Joel Coehoorn Oct 28 '13 at 21:31
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if coming from a data Table.

        public static void DataTabletoXLS(DataTable DT, string fileName)
    {
        HttpContext.Current.Response.Clear();
        HttpContext.Current.Response.Charset = "utf-16";
        HttpContext.Current.Response.ContentEncoding = System.Text.Encoding.GetEncoding("windows-1250");
        HttpContext.Current.Response.AddHeader("content-disposition", string.Format("attachment; filename={0}.xls", fileName));
        HttpContext.Current.Response.ContentType = "application/ms-excel";

        string tab = "";
        foreach (DataColumn dc in DT.Columns)
        {
            HttpContext.Current.Response.Write(tab + dc.ColumnName.Replace("\n", "").Replace("\t", ""));
            tab = "\t";
        }
        HttpContext.Current.Response.Write("\n");

        int i;
        foreach (DataRow dr in DT.Rows)
        {
            tab = "";
            for (i = 0; i < DT.Columns.Count; i++)
            {
                HttpContext.Current.Response.Write(tab + dr[i].ToString().Replace("\n", "").Replace("\t", ""));
                tab = "\t";
            }
            HttpContext.Current.Response.Write("\n");
        }
        HttpContext.Current.Response.End();
                }

From a Gridview

        public static void GridviewtoXLS(GridView gv, string fileName)
    {
        int DirtyBit = 0;
        int PageSize = 0;
        if (gv.AllowPaging == true)
        {
            DirtyBit = 1;
            PageSize = gv.PageSize;
            gv.AllowPaging = false;
            gv.DataBind();
        }
        HttpContext.Current.Response.Clear();
        HttpContext.Current.Response.Charset = "utf-8";
        HttpContext.Current.Response.ContentEncoding = System.Text.Encoding.GetEncoding("windows-1250");
        HttpContext.Current.Response.AddHeader(
            "content-disposition", string.Format("attachment; filename={0}.xls", fileName));
        HttpContext.Current.Response.ContentType = "application/ms-excel";

        using (StringWriter sw = new StringWriter())
        {
            using (HtmlTextWriter htw = new HtmlTextWriter(sw))
            {
                //  Create a table to contain the grid
                Table table = new Table();

                //  include the gridline settings
                table.GridLines = gv.GridLines;

                //  add the header row to the table
                if (gv.HeaderRow != null)
                {
                    Utilities.Export.PrepareControlForExport(gv.HeaderRow);
                    table.Rows.Add(gv.HeaderRow);
                }

                //  add each of the data rows to the table
                foreach (GridViewRow row in gv.Rows)
                {
                    Utilities.Export.PrepareControlForExport(row);
                    table.Rows.Add(row);
                }

                //  add the footer row to the table
                if (gv.FooterRow != null)
                {
                    Utilities.Export.PrepareControlForExport(gv.FooterRow);
                    table.Rows.Add(gv.FooterRow);
                }

                //  render the table into the htmlwriter
                table.RenderControl(htw);

                //  render the htmlwriter into the response
                HttpContext.Current.Response.Write(sw.ToString().Replace("£", ""));
                HttpContext.Current.Response.End();
            }
        }
        if (DirtyBit == 1)
        {
            gv.PageSize = PageSize;
            gv.AllowPaging = true;
            gv.DataBind();
        }
               }

 private static void PrepareControlForExport(Control control)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < control.Controls.Count; i++)
        {
            Control current = control.Controls[i];
            if (current is LinkButton)
            {
                control.Controls.Remove(current);
                control.Controls.AddAt(i, new LiteralControl((current as LinkButton).Text));
            }
            else if (current is ImageButton)
            {
                control.Controls.Remove(current);
                control.Controls.AddAt(i, new LiteralControl((current as ImageButton).AlternateText));
            }
            else if (current is HyperLink)
            {
                control.Controls.Remove(current);
                control.Controls.AddAt(i, new LiteralControl((current as HyperLink).Text));
            }
            else if (current is DropDownList)
            {
                control.Controls.Remove(current);
                control.Controls.AddAt(i, new LiteralControl((current as DropDownList).SelectedItem.Text));
            }
            else if (current is CheckBox)
            {
                control.Controls.Remove(current);
                control.Controls.AddAt(i, new LiteralControl((current as CheckBox).Checked ? "True" : "False"));
            }

            if (current.HasControls())
            {
                Utilities.Export.PrepareControlForExport(current);
            }
        }
    }
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1  
Just the code I needed, thanks. :) –  Kjensen Jun 15 '09 at 17:00
    
Scott, what's with the pound ("£") sign? What if I need it? Any other characters that are dangerous? –  Piotr Owsiak Oct 28 '09 at 15:32
    
PERFECT. Just what I needed. –  Brad Bruce Apr 8 '10 at 13:28
    
the £ sign is actually just something I needed for one of my customers. you can take it out. –  SpoiledTechie.com Apr 8 '10 at 19:05
    
Two potential issues (YMMV) with HTML tabular data masked as XLS file: (1) Microsoft Excel will trim leading spaces and zeroes automatically; and (2) Microsoft Excel 2010 warns the user when opening an XLS file containing HTML tabular data. The solution to #1 seems to be creativyst.com/Doc/Articles/CSV/CSV01.htm#CSVAndExcel (if leading spaces/zeroes are significant and need to be retained). CSV data files also suffer from #1 when opened in Microsoft Excel. –  schultkl Jul 30 '11 at 18:33
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Based on the answers given, and consultation with coworkers, it appears that the best solution is to generate either an XML file or HTML tables and push it down as an attachment. The one change recommended by my co-workers is that the data (i.e. the HTML tables) can be written directly to the Response object, thus eliminating the need to write out a file, which can be troublesome due to permissions problems, I/O contention, and ensuring that scheduled purging occurs.

Here's a snippet of the code... I haven't checked this yet, and I haven't supplied all the called code, but I think it represents the idea well.

    Dim uiTable As HtmlTable = GetUiTable(groupedSumData)

    Response.Clear()

    Response.ContentType = "application/vnd.ms-excel"
    Response.AddHeader("Content-Disposition", String.Format("inline; filename=OSSummery{0:ddmmssf}.xls", DateTime.Now))

    Dim writer As New System.IO.StringWriter()
    Dim htmlWriter As New HtmlTextWriter(writer)
    uiTable.RenderControl(htmlWriter)
    Response.Write(writer.ToString)

    Response.End()
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2  
Dan, you're on the right track. And I definitely recommend SpreadsheetML over HTML--breathing room for the future, since HTML support is frustratingly limited. But with HTML, SpreadsheetML, and OpenXML, the file sizes can be rather large, and will not be gzipped by the server. OpenXML requires a ZIP container with multiple files inside, and SpreadsheetML and HTML are both much faster to download if you zip them first and send the zip as the attachment. Use SharpZipLib and stream to it rather than directly to Response. –  richardtallent Aug 18 '09 at 22:41
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This is a free wrapper around SpreadML--it works great.

http://www.carlosag.net/Tools/ExcelXmlWriter/

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I've used this too - it's great. –  Paul Suart Jun 25 '10 at 14:19
    
This library also allows reading xls? –  Alex Apr 14 '11 at 18:35
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since Excel understands HTML you can just write the data out as an HTML table to a temp file with an .xls extension, get the FileInfo for the file, and blow it back using

Response.Clear();
Response.AddHeader("Content-Disposition", "attachment; filename=" + fi.Name);
Response.AddHeader("Content-Length", fi.Length.ToString());
Response.ContentType = "application/octet-stream";
Response.WriteFile(fi.FullName);
Response.End();

if you wanted to avoid the temp file, you could write to an in-memory stream and write the bytes back instead of using WriteFile

if the content-length header is omitted you could just write the html back directly, but this may not work correctly all the time in all browsers

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2  
Two potential issues (YMMV) with HTML tabular data masked as XLS file: (1) Microsoft Excel will trim leading spaces and zeroes automatically; and (2) Microsoft Excel 2010 warns the user when opening an XLS file containing HTML tabular data. The solution to #1 seems to be creativyst.com/Doc/Articles/CSV/CSV01.htm#CSVAndExcel (if leading spaces/zeroes are significant and need to be retained). –  schultkl Jul 30 '11 at 18:34
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I personally prefer the XML method. I'll return the data from the database in a Dataset, save it to XMl, then I create an xslt file that contains a transformation rule that will format a proper document, and a simple XML transform will finish the job up. The best part of about this you can format cells, do conditional formatting, setup headers and footers, and even set print ranges.

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I've done this a couple of times and each time the easiest way was to simply return a CSV (Comma Separated Value) file. Excel imports it perfectly, and it's relatively fast to do.

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One potential issue (YMMV) with CSV data: Microsoft Excel will trim leading spaces and zeroes automatically –  schultkl Jul 30 '11 at 18:34
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we export data from a datagrid to excel all the time. Converting it to HTML then writing to an excel file

Response.ContentType = "application/vnd.ms-excel"
    Response.Charset = ""
    Response.AddHeader("content-disposition", "fileattachment;filename=YOURFILENAME.xls")
    Me.EnableViewState = False
    Dim sw As System.IO.StringWriter = New System.IO.StringWriter
    Dim hw As HtmlTextWriter = New HtmlTextWriter(sw)
    ClearControls(grid)
    grid.RenderControl(hw)
    Response.Write(sw.ToString())
    Response.End()

The only gotcha with this method was that a lot of our grids had buttons or links in them so you need this too:

'needed to export grid to excel to remove link button control and represent as text
Private Sub ClearControls(ByVal control As Control)
    Dim i As Integer
    For i = control.Controls.Count - 1 To 0 Step -1
        ClearControls(control.Controls(i))
    Next i

    If TypeOf control Is System.Web.UI.WebControls.Image Then
        control.Parent.Controls.Remove(control)
    End If

    If (Not TypeOf control Is TableCell) Then
        If Not (control.GetType().GetProperty("SelectedItem") Is Nothing) Then
            Dim literal As New LiteralControl
            control.Parent.Controls.Add(literal)
            Try
                literal.Text = CStr(control.GetType().GetProperty("SelectedItem").GetValue(control, Nothing))
            Catch
            End Try
            control.Parent.Controls.Remove(control)
        Else
            If Not (control.GetType().GetProperty("Text") Is Nothing) Then
                Dim literal As New LiteralControl
                control.Parent.Controls.Add(literal)
                literal.Text = CStr(control.GetType().GetProperty("Text").GetValue(control, Nothing))
                control.Parent.Controls.Remove(control)
            End If
        End If
    End If
    Return
End Sub

I found that somewhere, it works well.

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1  
Two potential issues (YMMV) with HTML tabular data masked as XLS file: (1) Microsoft Excel will trim leading spaces and zeroes automatically; and (2) Microsoft Excel 2010 warns the user when opening an XLS file containing HTML tabular data. The solution to #1 seems to be creativyst.com/Doc/Articles/CSV/CSV01.htm#CSVAndExcel (if leading spaces/zeroes are significant and need to be retained). –  schultkl Jul 30 '11 at 18:35
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Here's a report that pulls from a stored procedure. The results are exported to Excel. It uses ADO instead of ADO.NET and the reason why is this line

oSheet.Cells(2, 1).copyfromrecordset(rst1)

It does most of the work and isn't available in ado.net.

‘Calls stored proc in SQL Server 2000 and puts data in Excel and ‘formats it

Private Sub Button1_Click(ByVal sender As System.Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles Button1.Click

        Dim cnn As ADODB.Connection
        cnn = New ADODB.Connection
        cnn.Open("Provider=SQLOLEDB;data source=xxxxxxx;" & _
          "database=xxxxxxxx;Trusted_Connection=yes;")

        Dim cmd As New ADODB.Command


        cmd.ActiveConnection = cnn


        cmd.CommandText = "[sp_TomTepley]"
        cmd.CommandType = ADODB.CommandTypeEnum.adCmdStoredProc
        cmd.CommandTimeout = 0
        cmd.Parameters.Refresh()


        Dim rst1 As ADODB.Recordset
        rst1 = New ADODB.Recordset
        rst1.Open(cmd)

        Dim oXL As New Excel.Application
        Dim oWB As Excel.Workbook
        Dim oSheet As Excel.Worksheet

        'oXL = CreateObject("excel.application")
        oXL.Visible = True
        oWB = oXL.Workbooks.Add
        oSheet = oWB.ActiveSheet

        Dim Column As Integer
        Column = 1

        Dim fld As ADODB.Field
        For Each fld In rst1.Fields

            oXL.Workbooks(1).Worksheets(1).Cells(1, Column).Value = fld.Name
            oXL.Workbooks(1).Worksheets(1).cells(1, Column).Interior.ColorIndex = 15
            Column = Column + 1

        Next fld

        oXL.Workbooks(1).Worksheets(1).name = "Tom Tepley Report"
        oSheet.Cells(2, 1).copyfromrecordset(rst1)
        oXL.Workbooks(1).Worksheets(1).Cells.EntireColumn.AutoFit()


        oXL.Visible = True
        oXL.UserControl = True

        rst1 = Nothing

        cnn.Close()
        Beep()

    End Sub
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If you fill a GridView with data you can use this function to get the HTML formatted data, but indicating the browser it's an excel file.

 Public Sub ExportToExcel(ByVal fileName As String, ByVal gv As GridView)

        HttpContext.Current.Response.Clear()
        HttpContext.Current.Response.AddHeader("content-disposition", String.Format("attachment; filename={0}", fileName))
        HttpContext.Current.Response.ContentType = "application/ms-excel"

        Dim sw As StringWriter = New StringWriter
        Dim htw As HtmlTextWriter = New HtmlTextWriter(sw)
        Dim table As Table = New Table

        table.GridLines = gv.GridLines

        If (Not (gv.HeaderRow) Is Nothing) Then
            PrepareControlForExport(gv.HeaderRow)
            table.Rows.Add(gv.HeaderRow)
        End If

        For Each row As GridViewRow In gv.Rows
            PrepareControlForExport(row)
            table.Rows.Add(row)
        Next

        If (Not (gv.FooterRow) Is Nothing) Then
            PrepareControlForExport(gv.FooterRow)
            table.Rows.Add(gv.FooterRow)
        End If

        table.RenderControl(htw)

        HttpContext.Current.Response.Write(sw.ToString)
        HttpContext.Current.Response.End()

    End Sub


    Private Sub PrepareControlForExport(ByVal control As Control)

        Dim i As Integer = 0

        Do While (i < control.Controls.Count)

            Dim current As Control = control.Controls(i)

            If (TypeOf current Is LinkButton) Then
                control.Controls.Remove(current)
                control.Controls.AddAt(i, New LiteralControl(CType(current, LinkButton).Text))

            ElseIf (TypeOf current Is ImageButton) Then
                control.Controls.Remove(current)
                control.Controls.AddAt(i, New LiteralControl(CType(current, ImageButton).AlternateText))

            ElseIf (TypeOf current Is HyperLink) Then
                control.Controls.Remove(current)
                control.Controls.AddAt(i, New LiteralControl(CType(current, HyperLink).Text))

            ElseIf (TypeOf current Is DropDownList) Then
                control.Controls.Remove(current)
                control.Controls.AddAt(i, New LiteralControl(CType(current, DropDownList).SelectedItem.Text))

            ElseIf (TypeOf current Is CheckBox) Then
                control.Controls.Remove(current)
                control.Controls.AddAt(i, New LiteralControl(CType(current, CheckBox).Checked))

            End If

            If current.HasControls Then
                PrepareControlForExport(current)
            End If

            i = i + 1

        Loop

    End Sub
share|improve this answer
    
Two potential issues (YMMV) with HTML tabular data masked as XLS file: (1) Microsoft Excel will trim leading spaces and zeroes automatically; and (2) Microsoft Excel 2010 warns the user when opening an XLS file containing HTML tabular data. The solution to #1 seems to be creativyst.com/Doc/Articles/CSV/CSV01.htm#CSVAndExcel (if leading spaces/zeroes are significant and need to be retained). –  schultkl Jul 30 '11 at 18:36
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Just avoid COM Interop via Microsoft.Office.Interop namespace. It is so damn slow and unreliable and unscalable. Not applicable for masochists.

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I recommend free opensource excel generation libruary which is based on OpenXML

It helped me several months ago.

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You can create nicely formatted Excel files using this library, quite easily: http://officehelper.codeplex.com/documentation.

Microsoft Office does not need to be installed on the webserver!

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CSV is easiest way. Most of the time it is linked to Excel. Otherwise you have to use the automation APIs or XML format. The APIs and XML are not that hard to use.

Information about generating XML for Excel

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I either go the CSV route (as described above), or more often these days, I use Infragistics NetAdvantage to generate the file. (The very vast majority of the time where Infragistics is in play, we're just exporting an existing UltraWebGrid, which is essentially a one-LOC solution unless extra formatting tweaks are needed. We could manually generate an Excel/BIFF file as well, but there's rarely a need to.)

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man, in .net i guess you could have a component that could do that, but in classic asp I have already done it creating an html table and changing the mime tipe of the page to vnd/msexcel. I guess that if you use a gridview and change the mime type maybe it should work, because the gridview is an html table.

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Two potential issues (YMMV) with HTML tabular data masked as XLS file: (1) Microsoft Excel will trim leading spaces and zeroes automatically; and (2) Microsoft Excel 2010 warns the user when opening an XLS file containing HTML tabular data. The solution to #1 seems to be creativyst.com/Doc/Articles/CSV/CSV01.htm#CSVAndExcel (if leading spaces/zeroes are significant and need to be retained). –  schultkl Jul 30 '11 at 18:37
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The only bulletproof way of avoiding the "It looks like these numbers are stored as text" green triangles is to use the Open XML format. It is worth using it, just to avoid the inevitable green triangles.

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The best method i've seen for excel reports is to write out the data in XML with a XML extension and stream it to clients with the correct content type. (application/xls)

This works for any report which requires basic formating, and allows you to compare against existing spreadsheets by using text comparison tools.

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Assuming this is for an intranet, where you can set permissions and mandate IE, you can generate the workbook client side with JScript/VBScript driving Excel. This gives you native Excel formatting, without the hassle of trying to automate Excel on the server.

I'm not sure I'd really recommend this approach anymore except in fairly niche scenarios, but it was fairly common during the classic ASP heydays.

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You can of course always go for a third party components. Personally, I have had a good experience with Spire.XLS http://www.e-iceblue.com/xls/xlsintro.htm

The component is pretty easy to use within your application:

		Workbook workbook = new Workbook();

		//Load workbook from disk.
		workbook.LoadFromFile(@"Data\EditSheetSample.xls");
		//Initailize worksheet
		Worksheet sheet = workbook.Worksheets[0];

		//Writes string
		sheet.Range["B1"].Text = "Hello,World!";
		//Writes number
		sheet.Range["B2"].NumberValue = 1234.5678;
		//Writes date
		sheet.Range["B3"].DateTimeValue = System.DateTime.Now;
		//Writes formula
		sheet.Range["B4"].Formula = "=1111*11111";

		workbook.SaveToFile("Sample.xls");
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One of the problems I've ran across using one of the solutions suggested above which are similar to this answer is that if you push the content out as an attachment (what I've found to be the cleanest solution for non-ms browsers), then open it in Excel 2000-2003, its type is an "Excel Web Page" and not a native Excel document.

Then you have to explain to users how to use "Save as type" from within Excel to convert it to an Excel document. This is a pain if users need to edit this document and then re-upload it to your site.

My recommendation is to use CSV. It's simple and if users do open it from within Excel, Excel at least prompts them to save it in its native format.

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You'll need to be careful with CSV if your users are scattered around the world. Here in Germany the comma is used as the decimal separator and so the semicolon is used as the value separator. Makes it difficult to create one file which is readable in all the different cultures. Therefore my vote would be for one of the XML formats. –  paul Feb 25 '10 at 13:27
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I would just create a CSV file based on the data, because I see that as the cleanest, and Excel has good support for it. But if you require a more flexible format, I'm sure there's some 3rd party tools for generating real excel files.

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Here's a solution the streams the datatable out as a CSV. Fast, clean, and easy, and it handles commas in the input.

public static void ExportToExcel(DataTable data, HttpResponse response, string fileName)
{
    response.Charset = "utf-8";
    response.ContentEncoding = System.Text.Encoding.GetEncoding("windows-1250");
    response.Cache.SetCacheability(HttpCacheability.NoCache);
    response.ContentType = "text/csv";
    response.AddHeader("Content-Disposition", "attachment; filename=" + fileName);

    for (int i = 0; i < data.Columns.Count; i++)
    {
       response.Write(data.Columns[i].ColumnName);
       response.Write(i == data.Columns.Count - 1 ? "\n" : ",");
    }        
    foreach (DataRow row in data.Rows)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < data.Columns.Count; i++)
        {
            response.Write(String.Format("\"{0}\"", row[i].ToString()));
            response.Write(i == data.Columns.Count - 1 ? "\n" : ",");
        }
    }

    response.End();
}
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just created a function to export from a web form C# to excel hope it helps others

    public void ExportFileFromSPData(string filename, DataTable dt)
    {
        HttpResponse response = HttpContext.Current.Response;

        //clean up the response.object
        response.Clear();
        response.Buffer = true;
        response.Charset = "";

        // set the response mime type for html so you can see what are you printing 
        //response.ContentType = "text/html";
        //response.AddHeader("Content-Disposition", "attachment;filename=test.html");

        // set the response mime type for excel
        response.ContentType = "application/vnd.ms-excel";
        response.AddHeader("Content-Disposition", "attachment;filename=\"" + filename + "\"");
        response.ContentEncoding = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8;
        response.BinaryWrite(System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetPreamble());

        //style to format numbers to string
        string style = @"<style> .text { mso-number-format:\@; } </style>";
        response.Write(style);

        // create a string writer
        using (StringWriter sw = new StringWriter())
        {
            using (HtmlTextWriter htw = new HtmlTextWriter(sw))
            {
                // instantiate a datagrid
                GridView dg = new GridView();
                dg.DataSource = dt;
                dg.DataBind();

                foreach (GridViewRow datarow in dg.Rows)
                {
                    //format specific cell to be text 
                    //to avoid 1.232323+E29 to get 1232312312312312124124
                    datarow.Cells[0].Attributes.Add("class", "text");
                }

                dg.RenderControl(htw);
                response.Write(sw.ToString());
                response.End();
            }
        }
     }
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If you have to use Excel instead of a CSV file you will need to use OLE automation on an Excel instance one the server. The easiest way to do this is to have a template file and programatically fill it in with the data. You save it to another file.

Tips:

  • Don't do it interactively. Have the user kick off the process and then post a page with the link to the file. This mitigates potential performance issues while the spreadsheet is generated.
  • Use the template as I described before. It makes it easier to modify it.
  • Make sure that Excel is set to not pop up dialogs. On a web server this will hang the whole excel instance.
  • Keep the Excel instance on a separate server, preferably behind a firewall, so it is not exposed as a potential security hole.
  • Keep an eye on resource usage. Generating a spreadhseet over the OLE automation interface (the PIA's are just shims over this) is a fairly heavyweight process. If you need to scale this to high data volumes you may need to be somewhat clever with your architecture.

Some of the 'use mime-types to trick excel into opening HTML table' approaches would work if you don't mind the format of the file being a bit basic. These approaches also fob the CPU heavy work off onto the client. If you want fine-graned control over the format of the spreadsheet you will probably have to use Excel itself to generate the file as described above.

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Bad idea doing automation from a web server. The alternatives may seem hack-ish, but they really will work much better. –  Joel Coehoorn Sep 29 '08 at 19:59
    
We use server-side OLE with Excel and it's a huge pain in the backside. If it weren't for the risk to our product**, we'd go with another solution. **Better the devil you know... –  DaveE Aug 30 '10 at 18:23
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