Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Is it possible to apply transformations to custom or premade controls in Swing? By one hand transformations are allowed, by other hand there are probably some gaps in implementation with this.

ATTENTION the question is about how to apply transfomations from control's parent, not about how to use transformations at all. I.e. transformation must be issued by the parent, while child should just obey it. So, please hint how to transform standard Swing controls or how to write custom controls which obey PARENT transformation.

Simple example which applies transform to Graphics before drawing childs and which doesn't work:

public class Tester_TransformDuringPaint_01 {

private static Logger log = LoggerFactory.getLogger(Tester_TransformDuringPaint_01.class);  
private static class JPanelEx extends JPanel {
private AffineTransform transform = new AffineTransform();

    public AffineTransform getTransform() {
        return transform;
    }

    public void setTransform(AffineTransform transform) {
        this.transform = transform;
    }       

    @Override
    public void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
        Graphics2D g2 = (Graphics2D) g;
        AffineTransform savedTransform = g2.getTransform();
        g2.transform(transform);
        super.paintComponent(g);            
        g2.drawOval(0, 0, 100, 100);            
        g2.setTransform(savedTransform);

    }

    @Override
    protected void paintChildren(Graphics g) {
        Graphics2D g2 = (Graphics2D) g;
        AffineTransform savedTransform = g2.getTransform();
        g2.transform(transform);
        super.paintChildren(g);
        g2.setTransform(savedTransform);
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {             
            JButton button = new JButton("Button");
            button.setBounds(0,20,100,60);              
            JPanelEx panel = new JPanelEx();
            panel.setLayout(null);
            panel.setBounds(10, 10, 640, 480);
            panel.setBackground(Color.PINK);
            panel.setTransform(AffineTransform.getScaleInstance(2, 1));
            panel.add(button);
            JFrameEx frame = new JFrameEx();
            frame.setLayout(null);
            frame.add(panel);               
            frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);               
            frame.setSize(0.5);
            frame.center();
            frame.setVisible(true);
        }
    });
}
}

draws the following:

enter image description here

while left half of the button looks alive, and bigger part looks dead.

This is because different pars of API draws button with different approach.

Modified O'Reilly hack 51

Below is the code based on @lbalazscs's example, which shows that transformations don't work even if they are "in bounds"

public class BackwardsJButton extends JButton {

public BackwardsJButton(String text) {
    super(text);
}

public void paint(Graphics g) {
    if (g instanceof Graphics2D) {
        Graphics2D g2 = (Graphics2D) g;
        AffineTransform savedTransform = g2.getTransform();
        AffineTransform flipTrans = new AffineTransform();
        double widthD = (double) getWidth();
        //flipTrans.setToTranslation(widthD, 0);
        //flipTrans.scale(-2.0, 1);
        flipTrans.scale(0.5, 1);
        g2.transform(flipTrans);
        super.paint(g);
        g2.setTransform(savedTransform);
    } else {
        super.paint(g);
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            buildFrame();
        }
    });
}

private static void buildFrame() {
    JFrame f = new JFrame("Test");
    f.setLayout(new FlowLayout());
    f.setDefaultCloseOperation(WindowConstants.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);

    f.add(new BackwardsJButton("BackwardsJLabel"));

    f.pack();
    f.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
    f.setVisible(true);
}
}

output follows (you may need to resize window and move mouse to see it, because Swing bug is located inside mouse hover code:

enter image description here

share|improve this question
2  
If you want to transform components in this way, you should check out JXLayer – MadProgrammer Feb 24 '13 at 1:48
    
what do you want to achieve? – kleopatra Feb 26 '13 at 10:35
    
I want to achieve exactly what I wrote. – Suzan Cioc Feb 26 '13 at 10:54
    
you must have a higher reason for turning loose all demons in hell ;-) Particularly: apply transfomations from control's parent smells like doctoring on symptons of a perceived solution (instead of stating the base goal and go from there) - it's fighting the winds of Swing instead of floating on them. – kleopatra Feb 26 '13 at 11:37
    
I want to have something like custom graphics editor, but not exactly. I need some reusable component (like extended JPanel) on which I could put my own geometric figures, like plots or shapes. I was thinking all this can be implemented by extending panels and components, but winds of Swing resist. Actually they always tend me to create my own single component which does everything by hand, i.e. Swing winds try to blow me out of Swing totally. Unfortunately I can't ask for Swing alternative here because I can imagine vulcanoes of hate will happen :D – Suzan Cioc Feb 26 '13 at 17:19

You have some innovative ideas how to abuse Swing :)

It is possible to apply affine transform while drawing components, but only if you are happy within the bounds of the component(for example you could mirror the text). If you override paint, you change how the component is drawn, but this will not change its size because the size depends on completely other variables, and you still cannot draw reliably outside its bounds.

I think it is not a good idea to transform the painting of premade components, because even if you succeed graphically, mouse clicks will be expected in the original places.

Note that you need to reset the transformation after you are done, because the same Graphics object will be used to paint other components.

AffineTransform savedTransform = g.getTransform();
g.setTransform(specialTransform);
... your drawing here
g.setTransform(savedTransform);

EDIT: here is a complete running example of a transformed component

import javax.swing.*;
import javax.swing.plaf.metal.MetalButtonUI;
import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.geom.AffineTransform;

public class ScaledButton extends JButton {

    public ScaledButton(String text) {
        super(text);
    }

    public void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
        Graphics2D g2 = (Graphics2D) g;
        Color savedColor = g2.getColor();
        g2.setColor(getBackground());
        g2.fill(new Rectangle(0, 0, getWidth(), getHeight()));
        g2.setColor(savedColor);

        AffineTransform backup = g2.getTransform();
        g2.scale(0.5, 1);
        super.paintComponent(g);
        g2.setTransform(backup);
    }

    @Override
    protected void paintBorder(Graphics g) {
        Graphics2D g2 = (Graphics2D) g;
        AffineTransform backup = g2.getTransform();
        g2.scale(0.5, 1);
        super.paintBorder(g);
        g2.setTransform(backup);
    }



    public static void main(String[] args) {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                buildFrame();
            }
        });
    }

    private static void buildFrame() {
        JFrame f = new JFrame("Test");
        f.setLayout(new FlowLayout());
        f.setDefaultCloseOperation(WindowConstants.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);

        f.add(new ScaledButton("ScaledButton"));

        f.pack();
        f.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
        f.setVisible(true);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I know I should return transformation to original state. But what if want to use transformation? – Suzan Cioc Feb 23 '13 at 0:01
    
I have wrote as you suggest to make code more "polite". But the question persist. – Suzan Cioc Feb 23 '13 at 0:05
    
Now with g2.setTransform(savedTransform); I see only one (small) button, which is logical because the button painting has no transformation. Previously it was only an accident, that the button got scaled (it used the same Graphics object). Note that you didn't include the source of JFrameEx, so I used a simple JFrame. – lbalazscs Feb 23 '13 at 10:35
1  
Well, if you override paint, you change how the component is drawn, but this will not change its size because the size depends on completely other variables, and you still cannot draw reliably outside its bounds. BTW, you need no center() method, f.setLocationRelativeTo(null); also centers a frame like in my example. – lbalazscs Feb 23 '13 at 17:21
1  
OK, I changed my example to include a (0.5, 1) scaling, by overriding paintBorder as well, and clearing the background in paintComponent. Of course, the button responds to mouse clicks within its whole bound, as I warned you at the very beginning. I think it is time to accept this answer, and ask other questions in separate questions :) – lbalazscs Feb 23 '13 at 22:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.