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Sorry for not well-explained title, but I will try my best to explain the problem here. There is probably a very easy solution to this particular problem, if i can call it that way, but I just can't figure it out with using only css.

Basically I have a parent ('wrapper') div which has min-width set and 2 floated children. As I am creating a dynamic page, user will be able to click on the 'right' floated div, and when he clicks on it new content will be added inside that div.

Problem occurs if the user wants to resize the browser after adding content to the div. Because the width of the main wrapper will be increased (when user adds content) when user tries to reduce the browser width (resize the browser) the 'right' floated div will go to the new line. So my question is: Is there any way (css) to disable div from moving to the new line?

Here is the link to the jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/LKgbx/30/

HTML:

<div id="wrapper">
     <div id="left">I'm left</div>
     <div onclick="changeText()" id="right">I'm right</div>
 </div>

CSS:

#wrapper{
    min-width:400px;
    background-color:#A3F8A9;
    display:inline-block;
}
#left{
    float:left;
    width:300px;
    background-color:red;
}
#right{
    float:right;
    background-color:blue;
}

JS:

function changeText(){
    document.getElementById('right').innerHTML="Just adding some text to make div longer";
}
share|improve this question
    
What do you want to happen? Right now you have a 400 px wrapper, a 300px red left div and a at-most-100px blue right div; anything over 100px will not fit. So... what happens to blue when it expands? Do you want red to shrink, or are you looking at hiding part of blue? –  Joe Feb 22 '13 at 22:21
    
wrapper has min-width set so it can expand when content is added. Problem happens when user resizes the browser window, div (with new content) will go to the new line –  AleksaIl Feb 22 '13 at 22:24
    
Sure, but i'm saying, you have a 400 px wrapper (due to browser resize). What do you want to happen to the div? –  Joe Feb 22 '13 at 22:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
<script type="text/javascript">
function changeText(){
    document.getElementById('right').innerHTML="Just adding some text to make div longer";
}
</script>
<style type="text/css">
#wrapper{
    background-color:#A3F8A9;
    position:relative;
}
#left{
    position:absolute;
    left:0px;
    width:300px;
    background-color:red;
}
#right{
    position:absolute;
    left:300px;
    width:100%;
    background-color:green;
}
</style>


<div id="wrapper">
     <div id="left">I'm left</div>
     <div onclick="changeText()" id="right">I'm right</div>
 </div>
share|improve this answer
    
it's is without floating but almost the same, just doing it with positioning. the trick is the child absolut is always absolut from parent relative. (and I think floating right doesn't work in all browsers but I'm not sure) –  caramba Feb 22 '13 at 22:27
    
Thanks for the reply, this look to be the way to solve this, but absolutely positioned div won't affect its' parent. I want the parent to expand when the new content is added, but I do not want it to shrink that much that div will go to the new line.I think the problem is with the min-width as the value of it is constant and when new content is added it doesn't match up forcing the content div to the new line. –  AleksaIl Feb 22 '13 at 22:42
    
yes the min-width is in your case for sure used at the wrong place. i dont think anything will shrink see the fiddle jsfiddle.net/ZZ4E4 see the fiddle add more lorem ipsum or just let one word be there –  caramba Feb 22 '13 at 22:52

Try removing float:right; from #right

#right{
    background-color:blue;
}
share|improve this answer

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