Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking to split certain lines of text from a file into an object and those objects added to an array each element being one line from the input file. From there I would need the script that called this script to be able to reference the tags in the object by their keys (as opposed to passing everything out to the print command and reassembling in the calling script.

I have the first part working and tested, but I'm unclear how to either send or deference in the calling script. I tried printing out each element of the array but since they're objects, once in the calling program, they couldn't dereference.

Here is a simplified version of the file that creates the array:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use CLASS::DATATYPE;

my $foundheaders = 0;
my $array_elem = 0;
my @MY_ARRAY = ();

open FH, '<', "dummy.txt";
# open FH, '<', "$ARGV[0]";

while (my $line = <FH>) {
    # once you've found the headers, this will begin to kickoff
    if ($foundheaders == 1)
    {
        # get line elements and create a new DATATYPE object using the elements
        # matched to the header index
        my @lineArray = split("\t", $line);
        my $thisdata = new CLASS::DATATYPE();

        $thisdata->FIRSTVAL(@lineArray[$HEADERS::FIRST]);
        $thisdata->SECONDVAL(@lineArray[$HEADERS::SECOND]);

        print "$thisdata\n";

        # Add new DATATYPE to the array
        $MY_ARRAY[$array_elem] = $thisdata;
        $array_elem ++;
    };

    # Search for line with "#R" at the beginning.  This will contain the headers
    if ($line =~ m/#R/ ) {
        # strip the first # symbol from the headers
        my $subline = substr $line, 1;
        chomp($subline);

        # split the line into an array and index headers
        my @headers = split("\t", $subline);
        &assign_headers(\@headers);

        # check off foundheaders flag
        $foundheaders = 1;
    };
};
close FH;

# test output value
my $test = $MY_ARRAY[2]->SECONDVAL();
print "$test\n";

1;

sub assign_headers
{
    package HEADERS;
    my @array = @{$_[0]};
    my $iter = 0;

    # check each array loop against known headers and assign the array index to header
    foreach (@array)
    {
        if ($_ eq "ROW1")
        {
            our $FIRST = $iter;
        };

        if ($_ eq "ROW2")
        {
            our $SECOND = $iter;
        };
        $iter++;
    }
}

The print statement can be canned it was just there to ensure that the data was at least created as expected.

Here is the DATATYPE package stored in the CLASS folder:

#!/usr/bin/perl

package CLASS::DATATYPE;

use strict;
use warnings;

sub new {
    my $self = {};
    $self->{FIRSTVAL} = undef;
    $self->{SECONDVAL} = undef;
    $self->{THIRDVAL} = undef;
    bless($self);
    return $self;
}

sub FIRSTVAL {
    my $self = shift;
    if (@_) { $self->{FIRSTVAL} = shift }
    return $self->{FIRSTVAL};
}

sub SECONDVAL {
    my $self = shift;
    if (@_) { $self->{SECONDVAL} = shift }
    return $self->{SECONDVAL};
}

1;

I used an arbitrary dummy file, anything with matching header line would work:

## blah blah blah
## blah blah blah
#ROWS   ROW1    ROW2    ROW3
1   fwewef  aewf    sfd8y9
2   gereer  few79   dfsui
3   svfsg789    aferw789    uifdgs
4   dfsgy   78fer   fds
5   78fgds  sdf78y  sfdgh

And the calling file would be something like the following, passing the input file and getting the output out:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use CLASS::DATATYPE;

my $file = "dummy.txt";

our @RESULTS = `/usr/bin/perl my_reader.pl $file`;

my $test = $RESULTS[2]->SECONDVAL();
print "$test\n";
share|improve this question
1  
Please shorten your submission and clearly state your question. Right now, this is most probably TL;DR for most people. –  speakr Feb 22 '13 at 23:02
1  
Your code is very non-idiomatic, and really does very little. The whole point of processing a file into an in-memory structure is so that it can be worked on more easily, and there is no reason why it shouldn't be put at the start of your main program. Is this an exercise of some sort? Your class is quite unnecessary - your data is just an array of arrays. –  Borodin Feb 22 '13 at 23:06
    
In response to Borodin: The rationale behind this was, there would be 2 different input file types (vcf and maf), each with different headers that should be resorted into a common datatype for processing. I am to make a class to handle this. –  user2101090 Feb 22 '13 at 23:36
    
@user2101090: have you been told to use a class? It is the wrong choice. It sounds like this should just be two different subroutines to import the two different data formats. –  Borodin Feb 23 '13 at 0:28
    
Yes, told to use a class to deal with inputting and outputting both filetypes. I intend to use two different subroutines, but my thoughts were that I store them both into objects of the same class. Sounds less promising now. –  user2101090 Feb 23 '13 at 1:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The only way I can think of to explain what I mean is to write the program for you.

This program does exactly what you need, and I hope you can see that you have written an unnecessarily huge amount of code to do the same thing.

I have gone with the class as you chose, but all you have written is a class that implements a Perl hash.

Please adhere to the capitalisation of the identifiers that I have used. Anyone else that is familiar with Perl will be used to them and will thank you.

The only major addition I have made is to use the List::MoreUtils module for the firstidx function. It returns the index of the first element of a list that complies with the given test. It isn't a core module and may need installing. If you really can't get new modules installed then it is a simple matter to write the equivalent function in the program. Come back if you need help with that.

Note I have updated the code to remove the dependency on this module, just in case.

I have made the class take initialisers from the constructor parameters, so you can assign the values when each object is created. Also, the accessors return the value before any change, as the value after a change isn't very useful.

I hope you can see that all that is required now is a second subroutine read_maf that processes the other file format, and there is no need for multiple processes.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Class::DataType;

sub firstidx {
  my ($match, $list) = @_;
  for my $i (0 .. $#$list) {
    return $i if $list->[$i] eq $match;
  }
}

sub read_vcf {

  my ($filename) = @_;

  open my $fh, '<', $filename or die qq{Unable to open "$filename" for input: $!};

  my @columns;
  my @data;

  while (my $line = <$fh>) {
    chomp $line;
    if ( @columns ) {
        my @fields = split /\t/, $line;
        my $thisdata = Class::DataType->new(@fields[@columns]);
        push @data, $thisdata;
    }
    elsif ( $line =~ s/^#(?=R)// ) {
      my @headers = split /\t/, $line;
      @columns = map firstidx($_, \@headers), qw/ ROW1 ROW2 /;
    }
  }

  return \@data;
}

my $filename = 'dummy.txt';
my $results = read_vcf($filename);

my $test = $results->[2]->secondval;
print "$test\n";

And the code for Class::DataType in Class/DataType.pm

package Class::DataType;

use strict;
use warnings;

sub new {
  my $package = shift;
  $package = ref $package if ref $package;
  my $self = {};
  @$self{qw/ firstval secondval thirdval /} = @_;
  bless $self, $package;
}

sub firstval {
    my $self = shift;
    my $retval = $self->{firstval};
    $self->{firstval} = shift if @_;
    return $retval;
}

sub secondval {
    my $self = shift;
    my $retval = $self->{secondval};
    $self->{firstval} = shift if @_;
    return $retval;
}

sub thirdval {
    my $self = shift;
    my $retval = $self->{thirdval};
    $self->{firstval} = shift if @_;
    return $retval;
}

1;

output

With the data you gave, this prints

svfsg789
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, was able to create a driver class to extract the values. So I think, aside from fixing code structure, what I needed to do was put the array creation code in a sub and then use a require in the caller. –  user2101090 Feb 23 '13 at 15:47
    
No, this is the wrong choice. require is rarely the right choice. Why are you so desperate to put your code in separate files? –  Borodin Feb 23 '13 at 16:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.