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I'm trying to export a customer list with only one address book entry per customer.

SELECT c.customers_id, c.customers_firstname, c.customers_lastname,
ab.address_book_id, ab.customers_id, ab.entry_company, ab.entry_firstname, ab.entry_lastname, ab.entry_street_address
FROM customers c
INNER JOIN address_book ab
ON c.customers_id=ab.customers_id
WHERE 1=1
ORDER BY c.customers_id ASC

What am I doing wrong?


EDIT: I have more than 1 address book entries because some customers have 2 saved addresses. But I need only one for the export.

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What's up with WHERE 1=1? What is the problem with your query exactly? Does it not work? Does it not return the right results? Which address book entry do you want to return? –  Explosion Pills Feb 23 '13 at 0:14
    
1. WHERE 1=1 is redundant 2. why do you have more than one entry per customer in address_book from the first place ? and 3. since you have more than one entry - which one should you choose to display ? –  alfasin Feb 23 '13 at 0:15
    
What's the determining factor for which address_book entry to return? –  sgeddes Feb 23 '13 at 0:17
    
1. ok 2. some customers have more than address (website is a shop) 3. It doesn't matter which one –  Cris Feb 23 '13 at 0:17
1  
Yes, you need to be very specific here about what the criteria are for which address gets returned. It is really easy to limit to one address, but may be more difficult to limit to the one address you want depending on your data. Information on table schema and sample data would help here. –  Mike Brant Feb 23 '13 at 0:18

4 Answers 4

I think this should work -- it returns the MIN(address_book_id):

SELECT c.customers_id, c.customers_firstname, c.customers_lastname,
    ab.address_book_id, ab.customers_id, ab.entry_company, ab.entry_firstname, ab.entry_lastname,   ab.entry_street_address
FROM customers c
    INNER JOIN address_book ab
        ON c.customers_id=ab.customers_id
    INNER JOIN (
        SELECT MIN(address_book_id) min_address_book_id, customers_id
        FROM address_book 
        GROUP BY customers_id
    ) m ON ab.customers_id = m.customers_id AND 
        ab.address_book_id = m.min_address_book_id
ORDER BY c.customers_id ASC
share|improve this answer
    
This answer and my answer will both work - only difference is he chose the MIN and I chose the MAX in my query. –  Matt Busche Feb 23 '13 at 0:27
    
@MattBusche -- completely agree -- both work well -- just remove the "ab." alias from your field names since you aren't aliasing the table in your subquery. –  sgeddes Feb 23 '13 at 0:30
    
good catch. I fixed my subquery (and then tried to edit the same time you did on my GROUP BY) –  Matt Busche Feb 23 '13 at 0:31

In MySQL, you can do the following:

SELECT c.customers_id, c.customers_firstname, c.customers_lastname,
ab.address_book_id, ab.customers_id, ab.entry_company, ab.entry_firstname, ab.entry_lastname, ab.entry_street_address
FROM customers c
INNER JOIN address_book ab
ON c.customers_id=ab.customers_id
group by c.customers_id
ORDER BY c.customers_id ASC

This pulls an arbitrary value for all the other fields. For the fields from customer, the values are fine since they are the same on all rows. For the fields from address_book, an arbitrary value is chosen.

In theory, this could mix values from different rows. Although this doesn't happen in practice, there is no guarantee. So, this is one method to do what you want using the feature called Hidden Columns in MySQL.

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Create a table that only returns one customer ID and one address_book_id like I've done below

SELECT c.customers_id, c.customers_firstname, c.customers_lastname,
ab.address_book_id, ab.customers_id, ab.entry_company, ab.entry_firstname,     ab.entry_lastname, ab.entry_street_address
FROM customers c
 INNER JOIN address_book ab ON c.customers_id=ab.customers_id
 INNER JOIN
 (SELECT customers_id, MAX(address_book_id) AS AddressBookID
  FROM address_book
  GROUP BY customers_id) AS NewAddressBook ON c.customers_id = NewAddressBook.customers_id AND ab.address_book_id = NewAddressBook.AddressBookID
ORDER BY c.customers_id ASC
share|improve this answer

UPDATE:

Since it doesn't matter to you which address_book entries to retrieve, this query will fetch the ones with max address_book_id value:

SELECT c.customers_id, 
       c.customers_firstname, 
       c.customers_lastname,
       ab.address_book_id,
       ab.customers_id, 
       ab.entry_company, 
       ab.entry_firstname,
       ab.entry_lastname,
       ab.entry_street_address 
  FROM customers c LEFT JOIN 
       address_book ab ON c.customers_id=ab.customers_id AND
       ab.address_book_id = (SELECT MAX(address_book_id) 
                              FROM address_book 
                             WHERE customers_id = c.customers_id)
 ORDER BY c.customers_id;

In theory you can have customers with no associated address book entries yet. LEFT JOIN will allow you to pull them. If you don't want this behavior just change LEFT JOIN to INNER JOIN.

Here is working sqlfiddle

Original Answer

This was my first answer and it will work in MySql although it can fetch arbitrarily values from different rows. See explanation in @Gordon Linoff's answer.

SELECT c.customers_id, 
       c.customers_firstname, 
       c.customers_lastname,
       MAX(ab.address_book_id),
       MAX(ab.customers_id), 
       MAX(ab.entry_company), 
       MAX(ab.entry_firstname),
       MAX(ab.entry_lastname),
       MAX(ab.entry_street_address)
FROM customers c INNER JOIN 
     address_book ON c.customers_id=ab.customers_id
GROUP BY c.customers_id, c.customers_firstname, c.customers_lastname,
ORDER BY c.customers_id
share|improve this answer
    
Yes in theory it might. Not the best way to go I agree. –  peterm Feb 23 '13 at 1:14

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