Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I'm pretty sure the value category of integer, character, boolean and floating literals are prvalues.

User defined literals are like function calls, so their value category depends on the return type of the operator function they resolve to.

I'm not clear on string literals. They have type "array of const charx" where charx is some character type.

It says in 3.10:

The value of a literal ... is also a prvalue.

But I think this might not apply to string literals?

What is the value category of a string literal? How did you determine this?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

So I'm pretty sure the value category of integer, character, boolean and floating literals are prvalues.

That's correct.

What is the value category of a string literal?

Per Paragraph 5.1.1/1 of the C++11 Standard:

A literal is a primary expression. Its type depends on its form (2.14). A string literal is an lvalue; all other literals are prvalues.

share|improve this answer
    
well that's straightforward isn't it? +1 –  Mooing Duck Feb 23 '13 at 2:26
    
embarassingly so. :) –  Andrew Tomazos Feb 23 '13 at 2:27
    
That does not make sense to me. Why would a string literal be an lvalue and not a prvalue? –  Remy Lebeau Feb 23 '13 at 2:28
1  
@RemyLebeau: Because it is an object. You can, for example, take its address, something you cannot do with an integer or floating point literal. liveworkspace.org/code/UAvdz$3 –  Benjamin Lindley Feb 23 '13 at 2:39
    
@RemyLebeau: Because it basically must have storage. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 23 '13 at 14:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.