Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
import java.lang.Thread;

class ThreadExperiment implements Runnable {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Thread t = new Thread(new ThreadExperiment());
    @Override
    public void run(){      
        do {
            num ++;
            try {
                Thread.sleep(400);
            } catch (InterruptedException e){
            }
        } while (num >= 0);
    }

    Thread t2 = new Thread(new ThreadExperiment());
    @Override
    public void run() {
        do {
            num2--;
            try {
                Thread.sleep(400);
            } catch (InterruptedException e){
            }
        } while (num >= 1);
    }


    int num = 1;
    int num2 = 10;
    t.start();
    t2.start();
    if (num == num2) {
        t.interrupt();
        t2.interrupt();
    }
  }
}

Trying to tinker with threads and going round in circles, always getting so close. I want two threads, one increasing a number count, the other decreasing a number count. If they meet, I want them to stop. However I am having trouble with public void run() - at the moment, it says I dont have a semi-colon next to both of them. What isnt right? Is this the right place to put public void run()?

Also, some websites are saying I need two separate classes forcreating threads - is there a reason for this? Maybe if one threads relies on calculations from the other but goes a different route, I can understand, but mine feels different, just two separate entities.

Lastly, do I need the import statement?

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by bmargulies, nwinkler, Muhammad Reda, jeha, spajce Feb 23 '13 at 12:56

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Until you have the syntax of the language under control, I respectfully suggest that you leave threads alone. –  bmargulies Feb 23 '13 at 3:04
    
Threads are a fundamental part of the language and as good as place as any to make a start on learning. Solving this problem delivers a lesson in syntax also. –  Capn Sparrow Feb 23 '13 at 3:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

1). You want your code to compile.

Your compilation problems are because you're to declare your run methods within the main method. Separate you method declarations and then just use main to create & run your threads.

2). You want to have two threads operating concurrently.

This means we need to either define two different thread classes or a single thread with logic to handle both incrementing and decrementing. Andrew Mao's answer gives you a start on how you might define two separate threads. My code above uses a single definition for a run method that uses a parameter to work out which way to go.

3). You want to have two threads operating concurrently on the same data, because while they're incrementing/decrementing separately, they need to check for collisions.

An easy way to do this is to create the objects you want to work on (num1 and num2) in your main method and then just pass references to these objects to your threads. Example in my code above.

4). You want to test things

All of java.lang.* is kind of assumed to be imported automatically. No harm in putting it there for clarity but auto-importer commands on your dev tool of choice will probably remove it as redundant.

public class ThreadExperiment implements Runnable {
    /* these fields are unique to each instance of ThreadExperiment */
    private int increment = 0;

    /* these are used to point to the original num1 and num2 instances created in your main method */ 
    private Integer myNumber;
    private Integer theOtherNumber;


/** 
 * Constructor.   
 */
public ThreadExperiment(int increment, Integer num1Ref, Integer num2Ref) {
    this.increment = increment;
    this.myNumber = num1Ref;
    this.theOtherNumber = num2Ref;
}


@Override
public void run() {
    do {
        myNumber += increment;
        try {
            Thread.sleep(400);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        }
        System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " -- " + myNumber);
    } while (!myNumber.equals(theOtherNumber));
}


/** 
 * Your static main method used to instantiate & start threads 
 */
public static void main(String[] args) {
    Integer num1 = 0;
    Integer num2 = 10;

    Thread t = new Thread(new ThreadExperiment(1, num1, num2), "Thread 1");
    Thread t2 = new Thread(new ThreadExperiment(-1, num2, num1), "Thread 2");
    t.start();
    t2.start();
}

}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you kindly for the explanation - I read somewhere else on here that put the run methods in the main method, so clearly made a mistake, thank you for clearing that up. I have two questions though; what does the constructor do in your code? Also, I don`t understand the bit about parameter - where would said parameter be in the code? –  Tom Pengelly Feb 27 '13 at 13:33
    
The parameters are the variables that we pass into each Thread instance. Calling the constructor creates a new instance of the ThreadExperiment class, and in this case accepts a series of 3 parameters that configure that instance. –  Capn Sparrow Mar 1 '13 at 10:45

First of all, your code looks like it should have lots of compilation errors which suggests to me that may be going about coding the wrong way. If you can't use an IDE, then you must compile early and often and not any any more new code until all compilation errors have been fixed.

For instance, you appear to have a method, run, embedded within another method, main, and you simply cannot do this. I suggest that you start over, beginning with a small code skeleton that compiles, and then again compile early and often. Also get most of your code outside of your main method. And no, the run method is not in the correct location as you should only have one run method and it should be in the class itself, not embedded within the main or any other method.

Regarding,

Lastly, do I need the import statement?

Your compiler will tell you this: Get rid of the import and see what happens.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the pointers on Java practice, I learned something from this - thank you for your time –  Tom Pengelly Feb 27 '13 at 13:33

The run method that is implemented by a thread needs to be in a separate class. You can certainly put one of them in your ThreadExperiment class, but it can't be both. In this case, you can separate the two threads into inner classes:

class ThreadExperiment {

  static int num = 1;
  static int num2 = 10;

  class Thread1 implements Runnable {
    @Override
    public void run(){      
        do {
            num++;
            try {
                Thread.sleep(400);
            } catch (InterruptedException e){
            }
        } while (num >= 0);
    }
  }

  class Thread2 implements Runnable {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        do {
            num2--;
            try {
                Thread.sleep(400);
            } catch (InterruptedException e){
            }
        } while (num >= 1);
    }
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {

    Thread t = new Thread(new Thread1());    
    Thread t2 = new Thread(new Thread2());    

    t.start();
    t2.start();

    if (num == num2) {
        t.interrupt();
        t2.interrupt();
    }
  }
}

Now we're getting somewhere, but you still need to fix some issues with your logic:

  • Having the ints as static isn't good practice. (But it's okay for this testing scenario.)
  • Your num == num2 check will happen only once and there are no guarantees on what the values will be there when that happens. It is very unlikely that the threads will be interrupted.
  • You need to declare the ints volatile since they will be read by different threads.
  • The while condition in Thread1 will result in an infinite loop.
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for helping me with the logic - I understand more what logic actually is. And I see how I can add new threads to one class, this really helps, thank you. –  Tom Pengelly Feb 27 '13 at 13:28

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.