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I am looking for easy way to store the output of the method in some sort of variable so that it can be used by another class.

For example:

partial class Form1 {
    public string orderNumber() {
        string ord="ORD"+get_next_id()+DateTime.Now.Year;
        return ord;
    }
}

In an instance of Form1 user enter the purchase details such as name, address... and when user clicks add entry button, the details is saved in the database with ordernumber generated by above code. In meantime when user click add entry, it kills the current form and bring up the another form which uses the ordernumber generated earlier. When I do like

Form1 m=new Form1();

and do something like(following is pseudo code)

m.orderNumber=string orderNUm. 

It generates different order number which I don't want. I want to use the ordernumber that was saved in the database by the Form1.

I want to store that ord somewhere so that I can pass it to another class.

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What have you tried? –  Achrome Feb 23 '13 at 3:16
    
No idea how can I store it.. –  Amrit Sharma Feb 23 '13 at 3:17
2  
Have you heard of variables? –  Barmar Feb 23 '13 at 3:22
    
I know man, but I have different scenario.. –  Amrit Sharma Feb 23 '13 at 3:25
    
I just noticed that you said "some sort of variable". So now I don't understand the question. Variables are where you store things in a program. –  Barmar Feb 23 '13 at 3:32

2 Answers 2

Another class can use the result simply by calling the method itself:

public class A
{
    public string orderNumber()
    {
        string ord = "ORD" + get_next_id() + DateTime.Now.Year;
        return ord;
    }
}

public class B
{
    public void DoSomeWork()
    {
        A a = new A();
        string result = a.orderNumber();
    }
}

The notion of "storing it somewhere" feels like the concept of a global variable. While one can accomplish essentially the same thing, that is to be discouraged as that does not represent object oriented design principals.

Just to understand how you could do that in C# (you should not do this), you could do:

static public SharedStorage
{
    public string OrderNumber { get; set; }
}

// Somewhere in your code

SharedStorage.OrderNumber = a.orderNumber();

// Somewhere else in your code

string orderNumber = SharedStorage.OrderNumber;

If you want to set an order number on an instance once and then use it going forward, you could put the logic in the constructor:

public class A
{
    public string OrderNumber { get; private set; }
    public A()
    {
        OrderNumber = "ORD" + get_next_id() + DateTime.Now.Year;
    }
}

// Somewhere else in your code

A a = new A();
string orderNumber = a.OrderNumber;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 sir, if you don't mind, why you said that "you should not do this" what is or will be the bad practice. can you give a brief reason? :) –  spajce Feb 23 '13 at 3:32
1  
Ahhhhh mutable state. How evil you are. While the simplicity of a single filing cabinet that everyone uses seems so tempting at first soon it runs into problems. "What the hell? Why is my file the value of 4? It should be 5?" cried Geoff. "Oh sorry, I was using that too" said Sandra. "Hey we're going to move marketing down the street, so we'll need to take that filing cabinet with us" "But we need it, if you move down the street, we'll need to move with you!". –  Quibblesome Feb 23 '13 at 3:38
1  
@spajce: Quite simply because it becomes confusing as the code grows and becomes more complex who put a value in shared state and what that value really means for the program. Beyond that, using object oriented design patterns allows you to create code faster that is more robust and more easily adapted to changing circumstances. –  Eric J. Feb 23 '13 at 3:39
1  
"Do we really need to share all of that data with everyone?". How about Geoff and Sandra just talk to each other about the data they need to share. Sandra can just take a reference to Geoff (as she's his boss) and Sandra can query Geoff when she needs to know what he's up to. Geoff can raise events to let Sandra know what he's up to. And marketing can just use their own filing cabinet that they don't share with anyone else. –  Quibblesome Feb 23 '13 at 3:41
    
wow.. thanks very much :) –  spajce Feb 23 '13 at 3:43

This is fairly basic stuff, but add this to the top of the class:

public string OrderCode;

Next add OrderCode = ord; above the return ord; line

Now whenever someone needs the ordercode they just make a call to <YourClass>.OrderCode

However, they could just call the method itself to get the order number as it is public.

PS: the orderNumber method doesn't follow c# conventions. a) it should be properly capitalized (OrderNumber) and b) a more meaningful name would be GetOrderNumber

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