Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a MySQL database with the following tables and fields:

  • Student (id)
  • Class (id)
  • Grade (id, student_id, class_id, grade)

The student and class tables are indexed on id (primary keys). The grade table is indexed on id (primary key) and student_id, class_id and grade.

I need to construct a query which, given a class ID, gives a list of all other classes and the number of students who scored more in that other class.

Essentially, given the following data in the grades table:

student_id | class_id | grade
--------------------------------------
1          | 1        | 87
1          | 2        | 91
1          | 3        | 75
2          | 1        | 68
2          | 2        | 95
2          | 3        | 84
3          | 1        | 76
3          | 2        | 88
3          | 3        | 71

Querying with class ID 1 should yield:

class_id | total
-------------------
2        | 3
3        | 1

Ideally I'd like this to execute in a few seconds, as I'd like it to be part of a web interface.

The issue I have is that in my database, I have over 1300 classes and 160,000 students. My grade table has almost 15 million rows and as such, the query takes a long time to execute.

Here's what I've tried so far along with the times each query took:

-- I manually stopped execution after 2 hours
SELECT    c.id, COUNT(*) AS total
FROM      classes c
              INNER JOIN grades a ON a.class_id = c.id
              INNER JOIN grades b ON b.grade < a.grade AND
                  a.student_id = b.student_id AND
                  b.class_id = 1
WHERE     c.id != 1 AND
GROUP BY  c.id

-- I manually stopped execution after 20 minutes
SELECT    c.id,
          (
              SELECT    COUNT(*) 
              FROM      grades g 
              WHERE     g.class_id = c.id AND g.grade > (
                            SELECT   grade 
                            FROM     grades 
                            WHERE    student_id = g.student_id AND 
                                     class_id = 1
                        )
          ) AS total
FROM      classes c
WHERE     c.id != 1;

-- 1 min 12 sec
CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE temp_blah (student_id INT(11) PRIMARY KEY, grade INT);
INSERT INTO temp_blah SELECT student_id, grade FROM grades WHERE class_id = 1;
SELECT    o.id,
          ( 
              SELECT    COUNT(*)
              FROM      grades g
                            INNER JOIN temp_blah t ON g.student_id = t.student_id
              WHERE     g.class_id = c.id AND t.grade < g.grade
          ) AS total
FROM      classes c
WHERE     c.id != 1;

-- Same thing but with joins instead of a subquery - 1 min 54 sec
SELECT    c.id,
          COUNT(*) AS total
FROM      classes c
              INNER JOIN grades g ON c.id = p.class_id
              INNER JOIN temp_blah t ON g.student_id = t.student_id
WHERE     c.id != 1
GROUP BY  c.id;

I also considered creating a 2D table, with students as rows and classes as columns, however I can see two issues with this:

  • MySQL implements a maximum column count (4096) and maximum row size (in bytes) which may be exceeded by this approach
  • I can't think of a good way to query that structure to get the results I need

I also considered performing these calculations as background jobs and storing the results somewhere, but for the information to remain current (it must), they would need to be recalculated every time a student, class or grade record was created or updated.

Does anyone know a more efficient way to construct this query?

EDIT: Create table statements:

CREATE TABLE `classes` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=1331 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci$$

CREATE TABLE `students` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=160803 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci$$

CREATE TABLE `grades` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `student_id` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  `class_id` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  `grade` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `index_grades_on_student_id` (`student_id`),
  KEY `index_grades_on_class_id` (`class_id`),
  KEY `index_grades_on_grade` (`grade`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=15507698 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci$$

Output of explain on the most efficient query (the 1 min 12 sec one):

id | select_type        | table | type   | possible_keys                                                             | key                      | key_len | ref               | rows   | extra 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1  | PRIMARY            | c     | range  | PRIMARY                                                                   | PRIMARY                  | 4       |                   | 683    | Using where; Using index
2  | DEPENDENT SUBQUERY | g     | ref    | index_grades_on_student_id,index_grades_on_class_id,index_grades_on_grade | index_grades_on_class_id | 5       | mydb.c.id         | 830393 | Using where
2  | DEPENDENT SUBQUERY | t     | eq_ref | PRIMARY                                                                   | PRIMARY                  | 4       | mydb.g.student_id | 1      | Using where

Another edit - explain output for sgeddes suggestion:

+----+-------------+------------+--------+---------------+------+---------+------+----------+----------------------------------------------+
| id | select_type | table      | type   | possible_keys | key  | key_len | ref  | rows     | Extra                                        |
+----+-------------+------------+--------+---------------+------+---------+------+----------+----------------------------------------------+
|  1 | PRIMARY     | <derived2> | ALL    | NULL          | NULL | NULL    | NULL | 14953992 | Using where; Using temporary; Using filesort |
|  2 | DERIVED     | <derived3> | system | NULL          | NULL | NULL    | NULL |        1 | Using filesort                               |
|  2 | DERIVED     | G          | ALL    | NULL          | NULL | NULL    | NULL | 15115388 |                                              |
|  3 | DERIVED     | NULL       | NULL   | NULL          | NULL | NULL    | NULL |     NULL | No tables used                               |
+----+-------------+------------+--------+---------------+------+---------+------+----------+----------------------------------------------+
share|improve this question
    
Is the sample data you provided above what your table looks like? If so, can you normalize this? –  Kermit Feb 23 '13 at 3:54
1  
You should seriously normalize your database, repeating columns are an anti-pattern. –  Jack Feb 23 '13 at 3:56
    
"I have over 1300 classes and 160,000 students" That's what databases are for and why you use MySQL and not Excel. ;-) If your query is slow, check your indexes. –  Oliver Feb 23 '13 at 3:56
1  
Really? Then what's Class 1, Class 2 and Class 3 then? That's a repetition. –  Jack Feb 23 '13 at 4:00
2  
Can you make a sqlfiddle with some sample data? –  Barmar Feb 23 '13 at 4:02
show 10 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think this should work for you using SUM and CASE:

SELECT C.Id,
  SUM(
    CASE 
    WHEN G.Grade > C2.Grade THEN 1 ELSE 0 
    END
  ) 
FROM Class C
  INNER JOIN Grade G ON C.Id = G.Class_Id
  LEFT JOIN (
      SELECT Grade, Student_Id, Class_Id
      FROM Class
        JOIN Grade ON Class.Id = Grade.Class_Id
      WHERE Class.Id = 1
    ) C2 ON G.Student_Id = C2.Student_Id
WHERE C.Id <> 1
GROUP BY C.Id

Sample Fiddle Demo

--EDIT--

In response to your comment, here is another attempt that should be much faster:

SELECT 
  Class_Id, 
  SUM(CASE WHEN Grade > minGrade THEN 1 ELSE 0 END)
FROM 
(
  SELECT 
    Student_Id,
    @classToCheck:=
      IF(G.Class_Id = 1, Grade, @classToCheck) minGrade ,
    Class_Id,
    Grade
  FROM Grade G
    JOIN (SELECT @classToCheck:= 0) t
  ORDER BY Student_Id, IF(Class_Id = 1, 0, 1)
  ) t
WHERE  Class_Id <> 1
GROUP BY Class_ID

And more sample fiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi @sgeddes, thanks for the response. That didn't work unfortunately: I stopped execution after 5 minutes. In general I think anything which attempts to join the grades table against itself ends up taking a long time. –  pricj004 Feb 23 '13 at 4:25
1  
@pricj004 -- no problem. I've edited my answer to include what I think should be a much faster solution. Let me know -- best of luck! –  sgeddes Feb 23 '13 at 4:58
    
Much faster! 43 seconds. Definitely getting somewhere. I've edited the question to show the explain output for your query. –  pricj004 Feb 23 '13 at 5:08
    
@pricj004 -- Glad I could help. Not sure I can think of any faster solution :D –  sgeddes Feb 23 '13 at 5:13
add comment

Can you give this a try on the original data as well! It is only one join :)

select
  final.class_id, count(*) as total
from
  (
    select * from   
      (select student_id as p_student_id, grade as p_grade from table1 where class_id = 1) as partial
    inner join table1 on table1.student_id = partial.p_student_id
    where table1.class_id <> 1 and table1.grade > partial.p_grade    
  ) as final
 group by
  final.class_id;

sqlfiddle link

share|improve this answer
    
@pricj004 Just give it a try. It is probably slow as well, can't think of anything better. :) –  jurgenreza Feb 23 '13 at 4:53
    
Hi @jurgenreza, thanks for the suggestion. It's not bad - took 1 min 46 sec on my machine and was a bit faster (1 min 37 sec) if I replaced the partial table with temp_blah (the temporary indexed table I created). –  pricj004 Feb 23 '13 at 5:03
    
@pricj004 Cool, hope it helps. –  jurgenreza Feb 23 '13 at 5:05
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.