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list=[[1,2],[4,5],[3,4],[4,3],[2,1],[1,2]]

I want to remove duplicate items, duplicated items can be reversed. The result should be :

list=[[1,2],[4,5],[3,4]]

How do I achieve this in Python?

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Does the order matter? –  Volatility Feb 23 '13 at 4:58
    
-1: refrain from naming variables to built-ins –  Abhijit Feb 23 '13 at 5:17
    
@Volatility, no oder does not matter. –  Sanjivani Feb 23 '13 at 5:21
    
@abhijit, it is just an example, not real code. –  Sanjivani Feb 23 '13 at 5:22
    
Even so, you shouldn't be using list as a variable name. –  Volatility Feb 23 '13 at 5:32
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If the Order Matters you can always use OrderedDict

>>> unq_lst = OrderedDict()
>>> for e in lst:
    unq_lst.setdefault(frozenset(e),[]).append(e)


>>> map(list, unq_lst.keys())
[[1, 2], [4, 5], [3, 4]]
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lst=[[1,2],[4,5],[3,4],[4,3],[2,1],[1,2]]
fset = set(frozenset(x) for x in lst)
lst = [list(x) for x in fset]

This won't preserve order from your original list, nor will it preserve order of your sublists.

>>> lst=[[1,2],[4,5],[3,4],[4,3],[2,1],[1,2]]
>>> fset = set(frozenset(x) for x in lst)
>>> lst = [list(x) for x in fset]
>>> lst
[[1, 2], [3, 4], [4, 5]]
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Another way, without using OrderedDict, frozenset, set and map.

lst = [[1, 2], [4, 5], [3, 4], [4, 3], [2, 1], [1, 2]]

unique = []
for item in lst:
    if sorted(item) not in unique:
        unique.append(sorted(item))

print(unique)

[[1, 2], [4, 5], [3, 4]]
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