Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In order to streamline future data analysis, I'm trying to write a script that will identify the different self-report scales included in a data.frame and perform routine analyses on each scale's items. Currently, I want it to identify which scales are present, find the responses for each of the scale's items, and then calculate the Cronbach's Alphas for each scale.

Everything seems to be working except when I run my function that should produce a list of alpha() outputs for each scale I get the following error:

    > Cronbach.Alphas(scales.data, scale.names)
       Error in alpha(data[, responses[[i]]]) : 
       Data must either be a data frame or a matrix

Obviously I know that this is saying the information being given to the alpha() function is not a data.frame or matrix. The reason I'm so confused though is that when I do these calculations manually step-by-step outside of my Cronbach.Alphas() function, it clearly tells me that it is a data.frame and seems to work like a charm:

    > class(scales.data[,responses[[1]]])
    [1] "data.frame"

This is driving me crazy and I'll be extremely appreciative of any help with figuring this out. My full code is pasted below. (Note: I'm pretty new to programming functions in R so the way I'm doing things is probably not optimal. Any additional advice is welcome as well.)

Also, it might help to mention that my code is designed to identify scale names based on the presence of an underscore in a column name. That is, "rsq_12" indicates the scale as rsq and the column as responses to item 12 of the scale.

   require(psych)

   ##### Function for identifying names of scales present in the data file #####
   GetScales <- function(x) {
     find.scale.names <- regexec("^(([^_]+)_)", colnames(x))
     scales <- do.call(rbind, lapply(regmatches(colnames(x), find.scale.names), `[`, 3L))
     colnames(scales) <- "scale"
     na.find <- ifelse(is.na(scales[,1]), 0, 1)
     scales <- cbind(scales, na.find)
     output <- scales[scales[,2] == 1,]
     output[,1]
   }

   ##### Function for calculating cronbach's alpha for each scale #####
   Cronbach.Alphas <- function(data, scales){
     for(i in 1:length(scales)){
       if(i == 1) {
         responses  <- list(grep(scales[i], colnames(data)))
         alphas <- list(alpha(data[,responses[[i]]]))
       } else {
         responses  <- append(responses, list(grep(scales[i], colnames(data))))
         alphas <- append(alphas, list(alpha(data[,responses[[i]]])))
       }
     }
     return(alphas)
   }

   ### Import data from .csv file ###
   scales.data <- data.frame(read.csv(file.choose()))

   ### Identify each item's scale ###
   scale.items <- GetScales(scales.data)

   ### Reduce to names of scales ###
   scale.names <- cbind(scale.items, !duplicated(scale.items))
   scale.names <- scale.names[scale.names[,2] == TRUE, 1]
   scale.names

   ### Calculate list of alphas ###
   Cronbach.Alphas(scales.data, scale.names)
share|improve this question
    
Does it help to add alpha(data[, responses[[i]], drop=FALSE]) ? –  Martin Morgan Feb 23 '13 at 14:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thank you to anyone who has taken the time to look over my code. I appreciate your help. I was working off of the suggestions left here when I realized a simple mistake on my part...

One of the scales in the dataset that I've been using as a test while working on this script had only one item in it. Thus, data[,responses[[i]]] in my Cronbach.Alphas() function was passing a vector (rather than a data.frame or matrix) to the alpha() function at that point in the for loop. It is impossible to calculate cronbach alpha for a single item scale because it is an index of inter-item reliability...

Sooooo, all my code needed was a way to identify scales with just one item:

    Cronbach.Alphas <- function(data, scales){
      for(i in 1:length(scales)){
        if(i == 1) {
          responses  <- list(grep(scales[i], colnames(data)))
          if(length(responses[[i]]) > 1){
            alphas <- list(alpha(data[,responses[[i]]]))
          }
        } else {
          responses  <- append(responses, list(grep(scales[i], colnames(data))))
          if(length(responses[[i]]) > 1){
            alphas <- append(alphas, list(alpha(data[,responses[[i]]])))
          }
        }
      }
      return(alphas)
    }

Sorry for wasting anyone's time with my mistake. On the plus side, by substituting this new Cronbach.Alphas() function into the script above, I've now posted a script that will automatically identify scales and produce a list of cronbach's alphas (provided the columns are named with an underscore after the scale names) for anyone who might interested. Thanks again!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.