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I've been reading tutorials and have learned nothing new. I have a table of customers. The customer's first and last names are stored in separate columns. I want to write a query that can search for customers by name, either first, last or BOTH.

Here's what I've got:

$queryyy = "
    SELECT *
    FROM `customers`
    WHERE
        `first_name1` LIKE '".mysql_real_escape_string($_GET['custname'])."%'
        OR `last_name1` LIKE '%".mysql_real_escape_string($_GET['custname'])."'
        AND `status` = 'active'
    LIMIT 6
"; 

If I want to find "Lindsay Thompson", I can query for "lindsay", or for "Thompson" and get the results I want, but if I query for "lindsay thompson" I get nothing.

I feel like I'm missing the point of the wildcards, or not using them properly. Can someone please explain this to me and correct my query..

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Do you want the exact match? Why do you have % there? –  zerkms Feb 23 '13 at 8:07
    
i don't necessarily need an exact match, the problem is i'm getting no results at all –  Adelphia Feb 23 '13 at 8:11
1  
The way you have it setup, it won't work. You should explode the string on the spaces and individually match the first and last name with wildcards (ie firstname LIKE 'lind%' or lastname LIKE 'thomp%') –  Supericy Feb 23 '13 at 8:12
    
thanks @Supericy i didn't think of that. the concat() answer below looks promising as well. –  Adelphia Feb 23 '13 at 8:14
    
@Supericy: so for the request "Linda Thompson" this will return all Lindas, regardless of her last name. –  zerkms Feb 23 '13 at 8:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Wildcards are introduced to express "any number of any characters" (in case of %).

So

col LIKE '%foo'

will match for foo value and barfoo value.

What you want is actually the opposite - you need to concatenate two columns and check if it's equal to the request, like:

CONCAT(first_name, ' ', last_name) = 'foo bar'
share|improve this answer
    
Why exactly does he need to do that in a search query? And how will this help him to search customers by only first name or by only last name? –  Igor Jerosimić Feb 23 '13 at 8:25
    
@Igor Jerosimić: "Why exactly does he need to do that in a search query?" --- why not? This question is about logic, not optimization. "And how will this help him to search customers by only first name or by only last name?" --- I have no idea, I just answered a particular question (see "If I want to find "Lindsay Thompson", I can query for "lindsay", or for "Thompson" and get the results I want, but if I query for "lindsay thompson" I get nothing.") –  zerkms Feb 23 '13 at 8:27
    
His request is "I want to write a query that can search for customers by name, either first, last or BOTH.". –  Igor Jerosimić Feb 23 '13 at 8:27
1  
@Igor Jerosimić: yep. So? Now he knows about CONCAT and may implement exactly what he needs. My intention wasn't to do the other guy's job completely, but to give a hint about possible solutions. –  zerkms Feb 23 '13 at 8:30

a % wildcard will match with any number of characters. To use the example that is shown in the page http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/string-comparison-functions.html D%i% would match David.

The problem that you are having is that you are searching either Lindsay or Thompson for %Lindsay Thompson, i.e. search either name for any number of characters followed by the full name. Therefore this will never match.

One option is to run the query on a catenated string of the two names.

SELECT * from customers WHERE CONCAT(first_name1, ' ', last_name1) LIKE '%" .mysql_real_escape_string($_GET['custname']). "%' AND status = 'active' LIMIT 6";

share|improve this answer

Try this, hope it'll help you

 $queryyy = "SELECT * FROM `customers`
             WHERE (`first_name1` LIKE '".mysql_real_escape_string($_GET['custname'])."%' 
             OR `last_name1` LIKE '%".mysql_real_escape_string($_GET['custname'])."') 
             or concat(`first_name1`,' ',last_name1`) 
             LIKE'".mysql_real_escape_string($_GET['custname'])."%' 
             AND `status` = 'active' LIMIT 6"; 
share|improve this answer
    
there are some typos, but this definitely helped me get perspective. thanks, –  Adelphia Feb 23 '13 at 9:58

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