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I have been searching all over and cannot find anything like this. Now, I won't bore you with my whole program. It's incredibly long. But, here's your basic overview:

int main()
{
  int i=0;
  int h=5;

  cout << "h(IS) = " << h << endl;

  cout << "testing comment.";

  while(i < 10)
  {
  cout << "I'm in the loop!";
  i++;
  }

  return 0;
}

Looks great, right? Okay, so here's the problem. I run it, and I get a segmentation fault. The weirdest part is where I'm getting it. That testing comment doesn't even print. Oh, and if I comment out all the lines before the loop, I still get the fault.

So, here's my output, so you understand:

h(IS) = 5
Segmentation fault

I am completely, and utterly, perplexed. In my program, h calls a function - but commenting out both the line that prints h and the function call have no effect, in fact, all it does is give the segmentation fault where the line ABOVE the printing h line used to be.

What is causing this fault? Anything I can do to test where it's coming from?

Keep your answers simple please, I'm only a beginner compared to most people here :)

Note: I can provide my full code upon request, but it's 600 lines long.

EDIT: I have pasted the real code here: http://pastebin.com/FGNbQ2Ka

Forgive the weird comments all over the place - and the arrays. It's a school assignment and we have to use them, not pointers. The goal is to print out solutions to the 15-Puzzle. And it's 1 AM, so I'm not going to fix my annoyed comments throughout the thing.

I most recently got irritated and commented out the whole first printing just because I thought it was something in there...but no...it's not. I still get the fault. Just with nothing printed.

For those interested, my input information is 0 6 2 4 1 10 3 7 5 9 14 8 13 15 11 12

THANK YOU SO MUCH, EVERYONE WHO'S HELPING! :)

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3  
Well, it works for me. not problem is not in the code you posted. (If your code is too long, maybe post it at pasteit or something and provide a link. –  phoeagon Feb 23 '13 at 8:50
2  
Note: because you did not flush with endl/flush, you may simply not be seeing the output. –  Aleph Feb 23 '13 at 8:51
1  
Run your program in a debugger, it will stop where the segmentation fault happens. It will then allow you to examine the function call stack to see how you ended up there, and let you walk up the call stack so you can see your code, and there you can then examine variables to see what might have caused it. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 23 '13 at 8:51
    
"I'm only a beginner compared to most people here :)" Don't be so sure! We're all learners here. –  Johnsyweb Feb 23 '13 at 8:52
    
Please post the full source code, most probably the bug is in the part of the code you have removed. –  pts Feb 23 '13 at 8:52

3 Answers 3

You slip over array boundaries, causing the corruption:

for (i=0; i<=4; i++)
{
  for (j=0; j<=4; j++)
  {
        if (cur[i][j] == 0)
        {
          row = i;
          col = j;
        }
  }
}

Your i and j indices must not reach 4.

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valgrind is a great tool for debugging memory access problems. It's very easy to use on Linux. Just install G++ and valgrind, and then run (without the $ signs):

$ g++ -g -o prog prog.cpp
$ valgrind ./prog

It will print very detailed error messages about memory access problems, with source code line numbers. If those still don't make sense to you, please post the full source code (prog.cpp) and the full output of valgrind.

I've run valgrind for you, its output is here: http://pastebin.com/J13dSCjw

It seems that you use some values which you don't initialize:

==21408== Conditional jump or move depends on uninitialised value(s)
==21408==    at 0x8048E9E: main (prog.cpp:61)
...
==21408== Conditional jump or move depends on uninitialised value(s)
==21408==    at 0x804A809: zero(int (*) [4], int (*) [4], int*, int, int, int, int, int, int) (prog.cpp:410)
==21408==    by 0x804A609: lowest(int (*) [4], int (*) [4], int, int, int, int, int, int) (prog.cpp:354)
==21408==    by 0x804932C: main (prog.cpp:125)
...

To fix these problems, add code which initializes the variables depicted in the error lines above (e.g. line 61, 410), then recompile, and rerun with valgrind again, until all errors disappear.

If your program behaves weirdly even after fixing all problems reported by valgrind, please let us know.

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Wrong, -1. Valgrind reports the technical problem. Your proposed solution is incorrect. E.g., in line 61 the uninitalized value usage is due to accessing out of bound address. It shouldn't be initialized, but rather not accessed. –  icepack Feb 23 '13 at 9:08
    
wrong conclusion from the output of valgrind. The problems are easy enough to find with a simple inspection of the code doing a paper trace along the way. –  diverscuba23 Feb 23 '13 at 9:10

Lines 57 - 67:

for (i=0; i<=4; i++)
{
  for (j=0; j<=4; j++)
  {
    if (cur[i][j] == 0)
        {
          row = i;
          col = j;
        }
  }
}

at least one of your errors is in this code, cur is declared int cur[4][4]; this means then when j==4 (and when i==4) you are not within the bounds of your array (well you are within the memory for some of them, but not all) valid values will be 0 - 3.

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