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I coded a solution for DFS non-recursive, but i can't modify it to make a topological sort:

def dfs(graph,start):
    path = []
    stack = [start]    
    while stack != []: 
        v = stack.pop()
        if v not in path: path.append(v)
        for w in reversed(graph[v]): 
            if w not in path and not w in stack:
                stack.append(w) 
    return path

Any ideas how to modify it?

With the recursive version i can easy have the sorting:

def dfs_rec(graph,start,path):
    path = path + [start]
    for edge in graph[start]: 
        if edge not in path:
            path = dfs_rec(graph, edge,path)
    print start
    return path

Input:

>>> graph = {
        1: [2, 3],
        2: [4, 5, 6],
        3: [4,6],
        4: [5,6],
        5: [6],
        6: []
    }
>>> dfs_rec(graph,1,[])
6
5
4
2
3
1
[1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 3]
>>> dfs(graph,1)
[1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 3]
>>> graph = {
        1: [3],
        3: [5,6],
        5: [4],
        4: [7],
        7: [],
        6: []
    }
>>> print dfs_rec(graph,1,[])
7
4
5
6
3
1
[1, 3, 5, 4, 7, 6]
>>> print dfs(graph,1)
[1, 3, 5, 4, 7, 6]

so i need to get this ordering in the non-recursive also.

Non-recursive solution:

I think that this also could be the solution, mark me if i am wrong.

def dfs(graph,start):
    path = []
    stack = [start]
    label = len(graph)
    result = {}  
    while stack != []:
        #this for loop could be done in other ways also
        for element in stack:
            if element not in result:
                result[element] = label
                label = label - 1

        v = stack.pop()
        if v not in path: path.append(v)
        for w in reversed(graph[v]): 
            if w not in path and not w in stack:
                stack.append(w) 

    result = {v:k for k, v in result.items()}
    return path,result

Input:

graph = { 1: [3], 3:[5,6] , 5:[4] , 4:[7], 7:[],6:[]}
print dfs(graph,1) 

Output:

([1, 3, 5, 4, 7, 6], {1: 7, 2: 4, 3: 5, 4: 6, 5: 3, 6: 1})

        1
       / 
      3
     /\
    5  6
   /
  4
 /
7    
share|improve this question
    
Could you give an example of input? –  ovgolovin Feb 23 '13 at 9:19
    
What's the problem here? In both cases, the return value of dfs_rec matches that of dfs. What results do you want instead? –  Eric Feb 23 '13 at 9:33
    
Yes the result matches, but in dfs_rec when the recursion ends it gives me the (by print start) the topological ordering of the graph, so now i want to make a topological ordering on the non-recursive function (dfs) but i could not succeed in doing it. –  badc0re Feb 23 '13 at 9:37
    
So you want both functions to return [7, 4, 5, 6, 3, 1] in the second case? –  Eric Feb 23 '13 at 9:47
    
[6, 5, 4, 2, 3, 1] and [7, 4, 5, 6, 3, 1] for dfs(graph,1) the non-recursive function. As you can see i already have it for the first function dfs_rec. –  badc0re Feb 23 '13 at 9:52
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1 Answer

You recursive solution doesn't seem to be producing topologically sorted output.

For example with this input:

graph = {
    1: [2,11],
    2: [3],
    11: [12],
    12: [13]
    }


      1
      /\
     / 11
    /    \
   2     12
  /        \
 3         13

we should get 13 prior to 2.

But the output of your recursive code is:

3
2
13
12
11
1

with 13 bellow 2.

Furthermore, the variable path seems to be just explored nodes and has nothing to do with path (and thus it should be set, not ordered list, to be more efficient for lookups).

All this makes it very difficult to grasp your code and correct the non-recursive version, given the recursive doesn't do what it should.


I've just crafted a recursive solution which makes a topological sorting. It traverses all the graph with depth-first-search and keeps a dictionary of traversed nodes with associated levels as values:

from collections import defaultdict
from itertools import takewhile, count

def sort_topologically(graph):
    levels_by_name = {}
    names_by_level = defaultdict(set)

    def walk_depth_first(name):
        if name in levels_by_name:
            return levels_by_name[name]
        children = graph.get(name, None)
        level = 0 if not children else (1 + max(walk_depth_first(lname) for lname in children))
        levels_by_name[name] = level
        names_by_level[level].add(name)
        return level

    for name in graph:
        walk_depth_first(name)

    return list(takewhile(lambda x: x is not None, (names_by_level.get(i, None) for i in count())))


graph = {
        1: [2, 3],
        2: [4, 5, 6],
        3: [4,6],
        4: [5,6],
        5: [6],
        6: []
    }

print(sort_topologically(graph))

Here is a stackless version. I haven't debugged it thoroughly, but it seems to be working.

from collections import defaultdict
from itertools import takewhile, count

def sort_topologically_stackless(graph):
    levels_by_name = {}
    names_by_level = defaultdict(set)

    def add_level_to_name(name, level):
        levels_by_name[name] = level
        names_by_level[level].add(name)


    def walk_depth_first(name):
        stack = [name]
        while(stack):
            name = stack.pop()
            if name in levels_by_name:
                continue

            if name not in graph or not graph[name]:
                level = 0
                add_level_to_name(name, level)
                continue

            children = graph[name]

            children_not_calculated = [child for child in children if child not in levels_by_name]
            if children_not_calculated:
                stack.append(name)
                stack.extend(children_not_calculated)
                continue

            level = 1 + max(levels_by_name[lname] for lname in children)
            add_level_to_name(name, level)

    for name in graph:
        walk_depth_first(name)

    return list(takewhile(lambda x: x is not None, (names_by_level.get(i, None) for i in count())))


graph = {
        1: [2, 3],
        2: [4, 5, 6],
        3: [4,6],
        4: [5,6],
        5: [6],
        6: []
    }

print(sort_topologically_stackless(graph))
share|improve this answer
    
I coded a quick solution for your answer pastebin.com/CMPBMCZE check why i need that ordering. –  badc0re Feb 23 '13 at 10:05
    
Thank for the response i will need some time to understand this version. –  badc0re Feb 23 '13 at 10:13
    
@badc0re Take a note that your algorithm needs to be relying on having elements in the graph with empty children lists, e.g. 3: [] etc. And I just lifted this need by using graph.get(name, None) method, which returns None, is name doesn't exist in the graph. Also I used seemingly difficult stuff from itertools. If it's difficult to understand, just skip it and output names_by_level itself. This takewhile-count stuff just outputs names_by_level in a slightly refurbished level-by-level way. –  ovgolovin Feb 23 '13 at 10:18
    
Just one simple question does topological sort have to give the exact same answer for every implementation? –  badc0re Feb 23 '13 at 10:37
    
I think it is the matter of what how we define topological sort. You may be getting something else by this term than I do. I assumed that topological sort produces a levels of nodes, each node in higher level depending only on the nodes in lower levels. By the way, we can't topologically sort, if there are cycles in graph, which in fact should be checked before topsoring (otherwise the algo will get into infinite recursion). –  ovgolovin Feb 23 '13 at 10:45
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