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I need to know do we have to check input parameters of class methods in PHP OOP or not?
For example imagine the method below:

public function show_message($message)
{
   echo $message;
}

What is the best solution if programmer don't pass the message parameter to method? Let PHP to show it's warning or run time error or do something else ?

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I think it is impossible to take these kind of things into account. What if he passes an array? What if he passes a datetime object? Etc. Etc. Etc. I'd just let PHP show it's warning, it's impossible to take into account everything, only if it is truly important that this is a string because you later insert it into the database or something I'd do something about a false paramater being passed. –  AmazingDreams Feb 23 '13 at 9:13
    
It all depends on what values ​​are allowed. If the function expects an object/array and work with it, then is NECESSARY that the class throws an error or exception. If $message is also omettibile, and if this behavior does not affect the operation of the class, you can also set a default value. show_message($message = null) –  Leggendario Feb 23 '13 at 9:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Allow for a default value, then trap for that default. This puts control of what you do in your hands rather than the simple default PHP behaviour

public function show_message($message = "\x00")
{
    if ($message === "\x00") {
        // decide how critical this argument actually is, and react appropriately
        throw new BadMethodCallException("The message argument is critical and must be passed to this method");
        // or simply apply a default if it isn't critical
        $message = 'Hello World';
    }
    echo $message;
}
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The "best" solution depends on what you want the method to do exactly, but generally, I'd suggest a combination of type-hinting and default values:

class Foo
{
    public function doSomething ($message = 'None')
    {
        echo $message;
    }
    public function somethingElse (array $foo = array())
    {
        echo '<pre>';
        print_r($foo);
        echo '</pre>';//will always be an array
    }
    public function onlyMyself (Foo $instance)
    {
        return $instance->doSomething('I know this method exists');
    }
    public function myselfOrNothing(Foo $instance = null)
    {
        if ($instance === null)
        {
            return $this->doSomething('No instance provided');
        }
        return $instance->doSomething('Instance provided to '.__METHOD__);
    }
}
$foo = new Foo;
$bar = new Bar;
$foo->onlyMyself($bar);//works fine
$foo->onlyMyself(array());//fails
$bar->myselfOrNothing();//works
$bar->somethingElse();//ok...

etcetera, you get the basic principle.
Note that, if you're using an abstract parent class (or just any old parent class), type-hinting a parent allows for the child to be passed, too:

class Bar extends Foo
{
}
class Foobar extends Bar
{
}
$fb = new Foobar;
$b = new Bar;
public function someClass(Foo $instance)
{//accepts instances of Foo, Bar and Foobar...
    echo get_class($instance);//can echo any class name
}
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2  
"Note that all classes are children of the stdClass class", Are you sure about that? –  Leggendario Feb 23 '13 at 9:31
    
@Laxus: You're absolutely right, PHP's stdClass is the default class, not the base-class. I've edited my answer, thanks for pointing that out to me –  Elias Van Ootegem Feb 23 '13 at 9:39

I think the type of error should depend on how important the function is and if that is enough of a reason to stop execution if the parameter is not there.

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if you are talking about input parameters validation. you can do something like this.

public function show_message($message = '') {

  $result = 'No message';

  if (!empty($message)) {

    if (is_bool($message)) {
      $result = 'It is a boolean';
    }
    if (is_int($message)) {
      $result = 'It is a integer';
    }
    if (is_float($message)) {
      $result = 'It is a float';
    }
    if (is_string($message)) {
      $result = 'It is a string';
    }
    if (is_array($message)) {
      $result = 'It is an array';
    }
    if (is_object($message)) {
      $result = 'It is an object';
    }
  }

  return $result;
}
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